is this crack ok ?

Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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[ Image: http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/more/IMG_0094.jpg ]



is this just a plaster crack on the foundation wall ?

Thanks


Originally Posted By: roconnor
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No one here can tell you if a pic of a crack you posted is okay, or the cause. Ya need to have a specialist look at that up-close-and-personal to formulate that opinion if it is a concern.


Just my opinion and 2-nickels ... ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


--
Robert O'Connor, PE
Eagle Engineering ?
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NACHI Education Committee

I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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My home inspector said in the report everything common cracking in the home. I read over internet to understand cracking.


Then I went by the home and took this photo, and sent to him.

He replied back that it is just plaster crack. I liked this forum and so wanted to take opinions here too.

I am not able to understand the difference between a plaster crack and other cracks.

Thanks
Sri


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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Well, it’s not JUST a plaster crack, but that does not necessarily mean it is real bad (and I am not saying it is very good either).


If you look closely, you will see the 'bulge' sticking out along the crack. This indicates there is upward pressure of the foundation toward the wall above, 'squishing out' what is in the crack.

My guess is that the foundation had, at some point, moved down, the crack had been filled, and the foundation has moved back up.

There are several causes of this, including (but not limited to) hydrostatic pressure in the ground. Periods of less or limited rain allow the ground to dry out some, which reduces the support of the foundation, which allows the foundation to move downward. Someone see this crack and, after awhile, seals the crack with caulk. The rains return to normal, the ground returns to its pre-dried out water content, provides more support for the foundation, pushes the foundation up ever so slightly against the wall above it, squishing the caulking out of the crack.

Anyway, try to state it in a manner where you can visualize what would be happening.

Do you need a structural engineer? Not until you first have a soils engineer (geologist, hydrologist, etc.) evaluate the soil. Then the structural engineer will know what he is working with.

But you should do this before you close.

Rob, did I explain that pretty close to what can go on in that case?


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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The crack is not visible on the inside of the basement. It is only on the outside. The home is 21 years old.


Thanks


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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Sri Reddy wrote:
The crack is not visible on the inside of the basement. It is only on the outside. The home is 21 years old.

Thanks


With the stucco having been applied to the foundation wall, if the stucco moves, that is because the wall is moving (the wall moves the stucco, not vice versa).

Is the interior of that wall finished off (with drywall, paneling, etc.)?


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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he interior has been painted with water-proof paint, and a white paint over it. no other finishing as far as I am aware.


Originally Posted By: ccoombs
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Jerry


I thought you gave a very good "possible" source of the problem. The water could be from the hose bibs or other irrigation.

It should be stated that all concrete will crack. The question is if the cracking affects the structure negatively. A soils and engineering evaluation would be advised. However, a definitive answer may not be possible.

Good luck Sri!

Curtis


Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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Thank you. I am a first-time buyer. Was blissfully ignorant of stucco, cracking, vertical , horizontal and what not … but thank you all for your support.


Originally Posted By: ccoombs
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Looking at the picture a second time I have a couple of extra questions. Do the cracks extend around the corner? Does the down spout leak? Not that the answers will get you any closer to solving the original question.


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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ccoombs wrote:
Looking at the picture a second time I have a couple of extra questions. Do the cracks extend around the corner? Does the down spout leak? Not that the answers will get you any closer to solving the original question.


Curtis,

These are my guesses.

Do the cracks extend around the corner? They have to.

Does the down spout leak? Probably. You can tell by the way the elbow goes into the downspout extension and from the water in the wall causing the efflorescence just below the crack.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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Thank you for looking at it.


Yes, the crack does go around the corner. I could not find out how far though. Because deck railings covered it up, and it was tough to look at it.

I do not know if it leaks. Home-owner could not give much answer to that.
Home-inspector in general said there was no indication of moisture in the basement, though he was not sure why Home-owner put a water-proof paint.


Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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Sri Reddy wrote:
he interior has been painted with water-proof paint,
![eusa_think.gif](upload://lNFeGuTetUAtwNVgUSOuUzgrGGK.gif)

Sri,
Is the foundation concrete block or poured concrete?


--
.


Paul Hinsperger
Hinsperger Inspection Services
Chairman - NACHI Awards Committee
Place your Award Nominations
here !

Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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This is a Cinder Block Foundation. Thanks Sri.


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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I am guessing that, if there is a crack high enough to see, there may also be a crack below grade.


"Water proof" paint indicates there was a 'need to water proof', and "water proofing" from the interior is not the correct way to "water proof" something.

You "water proof" by placing the water proofing on the exterior. You provide drainage for the leaking water once the water gets through, such as drainage lines or sump pumps.

Think of it this way: Would you build a wood hulled boat and keep it afloat by painting the inside of the hull? You probably could, but it will work better and last longer if you water proofed the outside of it.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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gotcha ! Yes, it has internal french-drain + sump-pump too. Water table is high in this area of Parsippany NJ.


Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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Well,


I’m going to go against the popular opinion here and say that there is either no crack or just a hairline crack in the foundation. The cracks in the stucco appear to be distanced apart such as to lead me to believe they run along the horizontal mortar joint. A high moisture carrying point.


The water proof paint on the inside is forcing the moisture to the exterior side only. The stucco has been affected by the high amount of moisture coming out of the foundation wall at that point.

One way to check if the is indeed a foundation crack with movement as earlier proposed is to check where the deck meets the foundation around the corner.

Remember there were no visible cracks on the inside. If there was a crack with movement enough to squish out caulk, the crack would go all the way to the inside.


--
.


Paul Hinsperger
Hinsperger Inspection Services
Chairman - NACHI Awards Committee
Place your Award Nominations
here !

Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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Yeah! What Paul said! icon_smile.gif



Wisconsin Home Inspection, ABC Home Inspection LLC


Search the directory for a Wisconsin Home Inspector

Originally Posted By: ccoombs
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Jerry- I assumed the same answers to my questions. They were more for Sri to ask his engineer and/or existing home owner. Thanks for the backup on my thoughts.


Paul- I didn't even consider if the foundation was block. My geographic location is limiting my thinking. I also agree that the interior water proofing is only a Band-Aid fix for not doing it correct.

I love the way everyone puts in their 2 cents until we $1.50!

Sri- I hope this information is helpful! Good luck with the purchase.


Originally Posted By: Sri Reddy
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Thank you everybody. I am going by the thought and hope that this is just a cosmetic stucco one, but to make sure I am also calling in a SE. Tough few days but u all have been amazing. thank u all so much.