New form required for all homes closing after Feb 1

I just came back from a CLIB approved wind mit class and was told that all homes closing after Feb 1 have t be written on the new form. That is going to create havoc for all of us who are still using the old form on houses not closing this month.

Do them on the new form at the same time Bill, then just send them out.

Or if anything is different, label it under the pictures, take for instance a strap with two nails on one side and one on the other which is a clip on the old for, will become a single wrap on the new one.

Same ting goes for the old clips that now require three nails.

What class did you take?

Everything I have inspected this month has two wind mits in my computer, but that won’t solve the problem of the agents and underwriters rejecting the new forms if they don’t know about them yet. That won’t happen though because they are so knowledgable and on the ball though… right?

Starting last week we began using the new form unless the present form was specifically requested (for whatever reason).

New pricing is in effect as well…30% increase.

Still a deal when you figure that the Hip roof rating alone amy force you to measure the entire roof perimeter.

**By the way, here’s a free one for all. **

The present form requires:
[size=2][FONT=TimesNewRomanPSMT]“Hip roof with no other roof shapes greater than 10% of the total building perimeter.”[/FONT][/size]


[FONT=Times New Roman][size=2]The NEW form requires:[/size][/FONT]


[FONT=Times New Roman][size=2]"Hip roof with no other roof shapes greater than 10% of the total roof system perimeter[/size][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman][size=2]." Yes, that’s overhangs and rise / slope.[/size][/FONT]

That’s right, be prepared to measure the whole damn thing. Break out the tape measure…The floor plan from the property apraisers office will NOT work! Building perimeter is NOT roof system perimeter.

How is that to be accomplished*** accurately*** on complex multi level roof systems?

Bill,

You never mentioned how the class was? Who was the instructor and what did you think.

How did he come to the conclusions he did with no experience submitting the new forms to insurance folks yet.

No one can tell me they know what they will or will not want. It is going to be a real mess.

My understanding of this is you measure the perimeter of the roof that is not hip and divide it by the perimeter of the hip. If its greater than 10% the roof is not hip. No slope involved.

If I remember correctly, it is the perimeter of the roof divided by the length of the non hip feature.
I am pretty sure it is going to be covered in the new course.

Perimeter: 45+30+45+30= 150
Length of non-hip feature: 12
150/12= 8% non-hip=Hip roof.
The wind mit form I have does that calculation for you.

Another one would be:
213/22=10.33% non-hip=Non hip roof.

How about using the floor plan as a starting point? You can measure the roof overhangs (from the exterior wall to the fascia) and make the proper additions to the measurements on the floor plan. If the non-hip portion is close to 10% you might want to use a more accurate method. But when the non-hip portion is 20%, 30%, or more I would think using the floor plan as a starting point would be fine.

That will work in many cases to give validity to the Hip rating. However, be prepared to measure the roof in a close situation.

Jay, I don’t think I understand the reference to overhangs generally the overhang for the soffit area adds to the perimeter, making the 10% a lesser value as related to the hip/ other calculation. Please clearify your viewpoint. Do you believe we should be measuring the leading edge of the roof at the fascia accounting for the linear footage of the pitched portion of the roof in the area of a gable? That is not clear to me from any training I have recieved in the past . However I can interpret the form that way. I don’t want to, I don’t think it was intended to be so, but I can see it.

That was a good idea make the form calculate % I added it to my forms

Manny was that difficult to do?

No, depending on which form designer you are using.
Adobe Professional uses java script, and you can find that almost anywhere.
Livecycle uses a different script, Formcalc, which is even easier.

Hey Bert just like Eric said I will call you tomorrow.

Thanks to you both.

“Jay, I don’t think I understand the reference to overhangs generally the overhang for the soffit area adds to the perimeter, making the 10% a lesser value as related to the hip/ other calculation. Please clearify your viewpoint. Do you believe we should be measuring the leading edge of the roof at the fascia accounting for the linear footage of the pitched portion of the roof in the area of a gable? That is not clear to me from any training I have recieved in the past . However I can interpret the form that way. I don’t want to, I don’t think it was intended to be so, but I can see it.”

Hello Brian,

I’m not sure what the prior training you mention may have taught. There has been so much contradictory methodology. So much of it has been left to interpetation, based upon prior programs, or one company’s or school’s philosophy.

However, going by the definitions of the form, you will always be correct.

The new form clearly states, ‘Total Roof System Perimeter’. This is different that the earlier form which defined ‘Building Preimeter’.

Therefore, the leading edge of the roof rather than the building foot print is utilized for the roof shape determination.

As such, the rise and slope of a gable, will be factored into the Total Roof System Perimeter. The over hangs will be factored into the Total Roof System Perimeter. These will then be compared with the bottom measurement of the gables, just as before.

My intention is to demonstrate that there are very good reasons these new WM inspections should be more expensive. If the price is too good to be true, the consumer may get less than they deserve by the ‘volume’ inspector.

Exactly.
Fill out the form and let everyone else shoot it out.

And, if everything was done properly, especially pertaining to permits, the new form is easier as you shouldn’t have to argue with anyone. Everything is spelled out.

Eric,

Your formula is written backwards but you somehow got the answer correct. You take the entire roof, not wall, perimeter and divide that into the non hip portion to determine the percentage. For instance the entire roof measures 220 feet but there is a 12 foot gable over the entry. You divide 12 (non-hip portion) by 220 (total roof perimeter) and you have 5.5% non-hip. 12/220=.0545=5.5%.

See what happens when you let the computer do things for you!
Yes, it should be 12/220 and so on.
Sorry.:frowning: