Observations on AHIT training?

Is AHIT still considered a top provider of Home Inspector education?

Recently I completed my required education for the State Inspectors License as provided by AHIT which as you may know costs just under $4,000. Several people recommend them as a good source of training, but after living in that classroom for 14 straight days I had some concerns. As the training went on my classmates privately brought up many of my same issues in During The Break Parking Lot Conversations.

We did not receive books. For reference materials we received spiral bound b&w copied manuals. The material in these technical volumes were written 20 years ago (copyright 1996), with the last update of any kind done 10 years ago.

The PowerPoint slide deck the instructor used during those 14 days mirrored the technical manuals, with most of the dated photos from the 1990’s, and none dated more current than 2006. The instructor admitted most of the photos shown in class were 22 years old. The majority of these images were seriously fuzzy, too dark or too blown out to clearly understand what was being illustrated. Many people commented on this during class.

But my biggest concern is all the advances that have been made in home systems that were not covered because of the age of our materials. For example our printed material said nothing about AFCI outlets, although the instructor did cover these in class. But more modern developments like split ductless HVAC and WIFI controlled water heaters were never mentioned at all.

I don’t even want to get into how much time was spent selling AHIT products and services. “If you use someone else’s reporting software you might be shooting yourself in the foot”. I anticipated some salesmanship but it was sprinkled much more through the 14 days than I was expecting.

I wasn’t going to say anything until I started getting emails from them offering “…this completely updated book from AHIT.” for $245. And on our State required field practice inspections the official AHIT policy is no students are allowed to go into an attic and many roofs they did not allow us to climb onto which I felt was a real loss of a learning experience.

So I guess I come back to my original question -** Is AHIT still considered a top provider of Home Inspector education?**

It sounds like you got ripped off. $4,000 is an awful lot of money for an outdated crash course.

FYI: Do not buy their report software. It’s also behind the times.

Fortunately I read a lot about the problems with their software before I even went into the class Christopher. Despite the pressure from the instructor I went with Home Inspector Pro and could not be happier with that program and the service.

Unfortunately we in Canada have the same things happen here

"Do yourecognize other training? https://www.nachi.org/forum/f25/do-you-recognize-other-training-115818/](https://www.nachi.org/forum/f25/do-you-recognize-other-training-115818/)
So Alberta is licensed but does notrequire association only training.
My training was done through Carson Dunlop $4500 and just finished.
540hrs over several months and 35 tests. "

Newer more modern information is available here at NACHI for free .

:mrgreen:

www.nachi.org/school

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I have zero familiarity with AHIT, but I have a few comments:

And unless you’re inspecting mostly new homes, you may not seen them.

I rarely see AFCI’s. Split duct system I think I’ve come across once. A wifi water heater? Never seen one. The majority of homes I inspect are 40-90 years old. Even when I am inspecting homes that are only 10-20 years old, I still don’t come across these often.

Wifi thermostats, sure. Pool equipment remotes? sure. But you generally just put these things into into bypass mode and inspect as normal.

Same with ASHI school training. The liability is apparently just too much.

As it was explained to me, the problem became students would get up on roof, and someone who didn’t realize they were afraid of heights would freak out, and it would take hours talking the student off the roof. Lame, but what can you do.

I made friends with a roofer who let me shadow him one day.

Oh brother. ASHI members are sissies. Anyway, come to the House of Horrors. Plenty of attics for you to inspect: https://www.nachi.org/school/internachi-university/house/

Thanks for the offer Nick, but I am definitely not that brave yet! You can be sure however that I’ll be doing my continuing education here at InterNACHI.

Is AHIT still considered a top provider of Home Inspector education? … Never has been considered that … EXCEPT for marketing. I remember 15-20 yrs ago before NACHI had gained a foothold they’d teach their students to put out PR / flyers / etc saying they were CERTIFIED inspectors and followed the ASHI standards (that falsely gave realtors & buyers the idea they were ASHI members at a time when that meant a lot in some areas). AHIT had lots of marketing tips like that.

Recently I completed my required education for the State Inspectors License as provided by AHIT which as you may know costs just under $4,000. … Costs go up & down seemly determined by who they’re aiming it at / We’ve seen it offered at $1, 895 / $1,495 / $895

Several people recommend them as a good source of training, but after living in that classroom for 14 straight days I had some concerns. As the training went on my classmates privately brought up many of my same issues in During The Break Parking Lot Conversations.

We did not receive books???. … In 30 years of inspecting and taking classes I’ve NEVER received a BOOK from any trainer including ITA, Kaplan, Carson & Dunlop, Champions, ASHI, iNACHI, etc. We always received Spiral Bound Manuals, etc. For reference materials we received spiral bound b&w copied manuals … Thats typical. The material in these technical volumes were written 20 years ago (copyright 1996), with the last update of any kind **done 10 years ago. … **Thats totally typical and logical BECAUSE most houses you’ll inspect are well out over 10 yrs old.

The PowerPoint slide deck the instructor used during those 14 days mirrored the technical manuals, with most of the dated photos from the 1990’s, and none dated more current than 2006.Thats totally typical and logical BECAUSE most houses you’ll inspect are well out over 10 yrs old. The instructor admitted most of the photos shown in class were 22 years old. The majority of these images were seriously fuzzy, too dark or too blown out to clearly understand what was being illustrated. Many people commented on this during class.

But my biggest concern is all the advances that have been made in home systems that were not covered because of the age of our materials. For example our printed material said nothing about AFCI outlets, although the instructor did cover these in class. But more modern developments like split ductless HVAC and WIFI controlled water heaters were never mentioned at all … With 35 yrs of inspecting, I’ve NEVER seen a WIFI controlled water heater; ONLY seen a split ductless HVAC once; AFCI breakers only seen on new houses (under say 10 yrs old).

I don’t even want to get into how much time was spent selling AHIT products and services. “If you use someone else’s reporting software you might be shooting yourself in the foot”… That we’ve heard from DAY 1 with every AHIT student we’ve ever talked to - ESPECIALLY in the $895 or $1,495 classes. I anticipated some salesmanship but it was sprinkled much more through the 14 days than I was expecting.

I wasn’t going to say anything until I started getting emails from them offering “…this completely updated book from AHIT.” for $245. And on our State required field practice inspections the official AHIT policy is no students are allowed to go into an attic and many roofs they did not allow us to climb onto which I felt was a real loss of a learning experience. … In 35 years that has been a POLICY with every professional trainer I know of. The liability is absolutely too great, COMBINED with potential damage to someones house they’d borrowed for the inspections.

So I guess I come back to my original question -** Is AHIT still considered a top provider of Home Inspector education? Never was, BUT do they sell a lot of training … YES. You are aware I hope that we have been told that Roy Newcomers group (founders of AHIT) sold it off to a corporate conglomerate somewhere a few years ago.

**

By the way … About 4 years ago in a class we were instructors at, there were 2 students (both past computer programmer / software types) that kept hammering the instructors and inciting other students with the same type complaints you brought up enough that the morning of the 3rd day of a 2 week class, the instructors took the students aside and politely told them to shut up or get out. One stayed the other one left (the other students and instructors were elated). The school refunded 3/4 of the tuition of the drop out. He went to another school … Got into home inspection and was out of business a year later. Everyone that met him said he was a constant complainer and negative personality. Something that does NOT go over big in a real estate transaction.

Just did my 12th practice inspection today, and saw my second split ductless system. Guess I better study up on them even if they are not often found out there.

I would very much like to think I was not a problem in class Dan. But I will certainly curtail my complaining and negativity here on the forum.

AHIT has been around a long time since the Newcomers started it. It’s been sold at least twice that I can recall. And in its day, it was fine. I just think that InterNACHI took the bar so high that good schools look weak in comparison. Not totally their fault.

Really common in north Seattle. I dont see many of them outside of that area in our region.

I attended many years ago and was disappointed- taught by the Newcomers. It was sub-par then and is now. The software they recommend is HORRIBLE and a friend recently went through the class and was also dissapointed. HIP Software and Nachi have been way more helpful than AHIT ever was- just my 2 cents.

The niche I see them filling is in the states where in person training is required. They come in and do a class straight through (i.e. 8-14 days straight) and done. If someone else offered a similar timeline with better training, they’d either have to improve or go under.

When I attended the class we had VERY outdated black and white books. The pictures were impossible to see in them. They also offered us their products at an incorrect/outdated price point. When the instructor noticed that had happened, he handed us the new version with higher prices for the SAME products. AHIT would not honor the lower prices that they first pitched to us. I was very taken back.

I really liked my instructor though. But in hindsight, I would have NEVER bought any of their products besides the actual class. Before buying anything they offer you should do your own research pricing, actual usefulness, etc.

Our newest team member will be going through AHIT course in a few weeks. I have extremely low expectations for the course. Since we are required to have at least 120 hours of in class training in WA it will meet that need.

If the training is as awful as the NARIES school I attended I will not be suprised but I don’t see how it could be worse.

Nick- if Nachi offered an in person training that we could have put him through I would have gone that route in a heart beat. The price for the 14 day class room course out here is $2600. It’s another $1000 for field training if needed.

I realize this post is over 2 years old, however, like the topics taught in class, no less relevant now. AHIT remains the best option for many reasons. I find it humorous how many home inspector forums and blogs are so critical of everything. I’m sure it has something to do with the fact ours is an industry if critical thinkers who make a living finding problems.

I was there in the class mentioned. As is common in many home inspector forums, context was not provided in the original post. The instructor provided a great deal of context for how you could be shooting yourself in the foot using other programs for reporting. AHIT’s app is designed to effectively deliver the report on site with all the detail the client needs. In addition, it is designed to be more customizable than any other app on the market in order to grow with the inspector’s skills. Delivering the report on site is a competitive advantage over other inspectors and can help grow the business faster.

As for selling it, context for that was also provided. It was clearly stated to the entire class how AHIT is dedicated to students’ success rather than being a teaching mill running as many students through as possible to find qualified employees for a multi-inspector firm like many other schools. While not a perfect formula, but very effective, AHIT’s profitability is built around how many home inspectors are using their reporting system. They are a for profit business just like so many other businesses. How many of you are willing to run your businesses at a loss because its better to give away things for free? The app is not perfect, nor is it for everyone, but it certainly is not “horrible.” I use it every day and have completed thousands of inspections with it - every one of them delivered to the client on site. “Horrible” is a subjective term and I hope the inspector who used that term doesn’t use similar opinions in his reports.

As for Nick’s comments, I expect him to say what he did because ours is also an industry where every inspector believes he’s got the only winning formula. I’d be happy to go toe to toe with anyone and discuss how NACHI training (or any other, for that matter) has its strong points in addition to drawbacks.

Lets address “outdated” information. How can you inspect homes 1-100+ years old without a complete understanding of construction techniques, tools, materials, and conditions from the last 100+ years? Yes, some of the photos were a little grainy, but no less effective or relevant. As a matter of fact, just in the 10 homes inspected following classroom training, students saw nearly 80% of the exact defects, systems, and components illustrated in those “outdated” photos. Relevance? Yes. Tons of it.

There were many reasons for not getting on the roof. Rain, roof material conditions, height, and pitch prevented the class from accessing the roof on several of the homes. It happens in real life, too. We learned how to inspect the roof from the ground with binoculars, ladder at the eaves, etc. Just like real home inspectors have to do every day.

Not traversing the attics is a liability issue for any school. They have several instances where students didn’t follow directions and put their foot through the ceiling. Call me crazy, but that might get expensive and limit opportunities for future students. The instructor also provided context for this. The class was advised to perform another 15-20 practice inspections AFTER class before performing fee paid inspections in order to master the process, flow, communications skills, and reporting. AHIT provides technical support from instructors to students after the class to assist with this. I remember the phrase spoken many times in class that no experienced home inspector can argue with, “Repetition is the mother of skill.”

Washington requires 120 hours of classroom training and 40 hours of field training - more than any other state in the country with the exception of New York. Not one minute was wasted in those 160 hours. But, 160 hours should not be considered as replacement for experience. No one can put decades of experience into a two week class. Some of the learning must occur once class is completed.

WIFI controlled appliances were addressed, as were AFCI technologies. They were addressed in the context of a home inspection. In other words, home inspectors test the functionality of the equipment, not the accessories like remote apps and advanced features.

In summary, “new” does not necessarily mean relevant. Home inspectors see a lot of old stuff. We also get a lot of questions from clients expecting us to explain the hows and whys. AHIT blended old and new technologies, materials, methods and tools throughout its curriculum, making up the base knowledge anyone needs to start their new career. In addition, there was satisfactory information provided to prepare for marketing a new business, pass the state exam and demonstrate competency for a license.

Finally, yes, I was the instructor. I continue to teach for AHIT, have served on the Washington State Home Inspector Advisory Board, and work to assist in developing, updating, and improving our offerings to students and inspectors with the rest of the team at AHIT because I believe in what we’re doing and in our commitment to our students.

Thank you for reading my post.

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