OSHA

Originally Posted By: al
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I was just confronted by an OSHA inspector and he said I as a home inspector because I am incorporated I need to meet the 10 hour requirement,has anyone heard of this


Originally Posted By: jjudy
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What were you inspecting that OSHA would be involved?


Originally Posted By: al
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its not what i was inspecting they say you need to meet there 10 hour training like any other company ,be a factory forklift driver or a machine operator


Originally Posted By: ekartal
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Maybe he thinks your a tradesman. eusa_snooty.gif


Erol K.


Originally Posted By: jfarsetta
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Tell him to pound salt. OSHA is a federal organization. The only federal standards or requirements for the HI pertains to HUD inspections. Incorporation is a state and federal designation. It has to do with financials, taxes, and liability. Hand him a quarter and tell him to buy a cup of reality. icon_wink.gif


Sheesh!!!


--
Joe Farsetta

Illigitimi Non Carborundum
"Dont let the bastards grind you down..."

Originally Posted By: rbracklow
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Well Guys, guess what??


The OSHA Inspector is correct!! This is a valid situation, and unfortunately, most of us do not keep up with the OSHA rules & regs. The 10 hour Exam is a OSHA requirement, whether we like it or not!!

In our business there are a number of OSHA related items that we need to be aware of, such as;

1. Confined spaces (crawl spaces)
2. Electrical safety.
3. Hazard Communication.
4. Personal Protective Equipment.
5. Flammable & Combustion Liquids.
5. Walking-Working surfaces (slips, trips & falls).
6. Hand & Portable Powered Tools.
7. Etc.

These are just some of the listed safety items that we need to be aware of. If we find ourselves in violation of any of these and are cited, the second time that we are caught for an infraction, we can be fined for up to $70,000.00. And, OSHA does enforce this!! I know, I've seen this happen too many times during my Construction Management & Inspection periods.

Ron.


--
The highest compliment my clients can give me, is the referral of their Friends, Family and Business Associates!

NorCal NACHI Chapter Founder and Chairman.

Originally Posted By: al
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OOOOOOOOOOOOweeeee good thing I didnt tell him to pound salt, eusa_naughty.gif


Just checked with another OSHA Inspector and he says we must meet that guideline if we are incorporated or a company no matter how many employees we have


Originally Posted By: jfarsetta
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Not true, guys. What are we inspecting, and where are we required to meet these requirements? If we have employees, yes. But as corporation with a single employee, no.


The fact that we are inspectors has no bearing on this requirement. I have yet to receive any documentation on the subject from any federal or state agency.


--
Joe Farsetta

Illigitimi Non Carborundum
"Dont let the bastards grind you down..."

Originally Posted By: rbracklow
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site and check it out…


I had to take the 10 hour course to meet my business requirements.

Now don't be onory!! ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)

Ron.


--
The highest compliment my clients can give me, is the referral of their Friends, Family and Business Associates!

NorCal NACHI Chapter Founder and Chairman.

Originally Posted By: dfrend
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Joe you are dangerously wrong!


Quote:
This Act shall apply with respect to employment performed in a workplace in a State, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Wake Island, Outer Continental Shelf Lands defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, Johnston Island, and the Canal Zone. The Secretary of the Interior shall, by regulation, provide for judicial enforcement of this Act by the courts established for areas in which there are no United States district courts having jurisdiction.


If you are in a workplace (and yes, a home you are inspecting is considered a workplace) you MUST follow all OSHA regulations. In all honesty, most inspectors violate these regulations everyday. How many of you set up a fall protection system on a roof?

Also, some states like Maryland, have a state agency. MD has MOSH. State regulations can be more strict than OSHA but not less.

I won't comment on my certifications, but if you can't find a class :

http://apps.mfri.org/cgi-bin/coursedetails.cgi?CID=215&SC=1

If anyone wants this can be arranged for a group, like at the convention. Let me know, I can set it up as I work for them.


--
Daniel R Frend
www.nachifoundation.org
The Home Inspector Store
www.homeinspectorstore.com

Originally Posted By: kdemski
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How do we get a definitive ruling on this one?


Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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I took the 10 hour course, but thru a construction company I was working for. I wonder if it’s valid for my HI business too?



Wisconsin Home Inspection, ABC Home Inspection LLC


Search the directory for a Wisconsin Home Inspector

Originally Posted By: rbracklow
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Absolutely,


The 10 hour course, is a 10 hour course, doesn't make any difference where you took it. As long as you have that little OSHA certificate, it's valid any where!!

Ron.


--
The highest compliment my clients can give me, is the referral of their Friends, Family and Business Associates!

NorCal NACHI Chapter Founder and Chairman.

Originally Posted By: clawrenson
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Canadian ViewPoint: It is interesting following this thread and surprised by some of the comments. Safety is an extremely important issue to our clients, to the homeowner and also to the inspector.


Here in Canada - home inspectors are basically considered contractors and have more recently come under similar scrutiny of safety concerns. Do you take the cover off an electrical panel, do you climb on roofs, do you enter confined spaces - and this list goes on. Have you come face to face with mold, uffi, vermiculite, or other dangerous materials or substances? If you go onto a new construction site - the builder must comply with safety - why not the same rule for the home inspector too?

My point being safety is a concern for everyone and is part of what far too many take for granted. Get certified or take the training and that will stop them from having excuses to stop you, and furthermore practice safe inspections - its in your own and everyone elses best interest.


--
Ontario Home Inspections Inc.

Originally Posted By: jjudy
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icon_question.gif CODE?


Each job site, task or work being performed must be evaluated. A JSA should be performed. The OSHA codes like many others, NEC, state, city building codes are not clear or differentiate the task and are applied in the wrong way or in a way not intended. Thus leading to wrong application of the code and programs not intended nor required. I have a contact that should be able to provide some answers I’ll contact him.


Originally Posted By: James D Mosier
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I currently work in a factory. A disgruntled worker called OSHA about some percieved safety issue. The OSHA inspector spent the better part of a day at our plant and determined that the original complaint wasn’t valid but we needed to install lids on any trash can that could possibly be used for food waste. icon_rolleyes.gif


A couple months later we had a worker lose a hand in our biggest machine, a 220 ton extrusion press. Too bad OSHA paid more attention to the trash cans than presses.

I also heard that their funding was recently cut thus giving them extra incentive to find problems and levy fines.


--
Jim Mosier

Originally Posted By: jfarsetta
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I have just visited the OSHA site, and have spent the past 2+ hours trying to find ANYTHING relating to a requirement for our profession, or anything that comes close.


Safety in the worklace, and OSHA standards, were put into place to prevent EMPLOYEES from being put into dangerous situations. To state that a home we are inspectingf becomes a "workplace" is a stretch.

I would like someone to point to the specific requirement, by OSHA directive, which requires a sole proprietor or corp owner to submit to OSHA training and certification. I'm not speaking of multi-inspector firms.

It doesnt exist. I will call OSHA tomorrow to get a definitive answer, or guidance to the directive, which if found, I will gladly share with everyone.

I'll go one step further... Worked for a fortune 5 company (manufacturing, R&D, chemical) - never received OSHA training or certification. Worked for the largest State Agency in NJ - never received OSHA training or certification (diversity in the workplace and sexual harassment seminars out the ying-yang, though). Worked for Verizon... ran 430 engineers in the NE - never had OSHA training and was never directed to send an employee to a program by ANYONE on the corporation. The list goes on and on...


--
Joe Farsetta

Illigitimi Non Carborundum
"Dont let the bastards grind you down..."

Originally Posted By: tgardner
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In our business, knowledge keeps you alive. If you can, take the Haz-Mat worker’s training course. Confined spaces can kill ( so can septic tanks) learn and Live.


tg


Originally Posted By: jhagarty
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rbracklow wrote:
Well Guys, guess what??

The OSHA Inspector is correct!! This is a valid situation, and unfortunately, most of us do not keep up with the OSHA rules & regs. The 10 hour Exam is a OSHA requirement, whether we like it or not!!

In our business there are a number of OSHA related items that we need to be aware of, such as;

1. Confined spaces (crawl spaces)
2. Electrical safety.
3. Hazard Communication.
4. Personal Protective Equipment.
5. Flammable & Combustion Liquids.
5. Walking-Working surfaces (slips, trips & falls).
6. Hand & Portable Powered Tools.
7. Etc.

These are just some of the listed safety items that we need to be aware of. If we find ourselves in violation of any of these and are cited, the second time that we are caught for an infraction, we can be fined for up to $70,000.00. And, OSHA does enforce this!! I know, I've seen this happen too many times during my Construction Management & Inspection periods.

Ron.


Ron:

I am not aware of any direct application of this training to the Home Inspection Industry. I had participated in 40-80 hours of mandatory OSHA training each year that covered many of the topics you listed plus many more. Does that count?


--
Joseph Hagarty

HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: jfarsetta
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I do not work with hazardous materials (in the traditional sense). I had hazmat training some time ago, as a volunteer firefighter. I had hazmet training when I worked for a chemical company.


Back on point...I want t know where the specific requirement for OSHA training exists for HIs.


--
Joe Farsetta

Illigitimi Non Carborundum
"Dont let the bastards grind you down..."