Shingle anomalies

(Taylor Steele, TREC Lisence #23366) #1

Hello Everyone. I am working on my mock inspections and ran across these shingles on a friends house that I inspected yesterday. It looks like some sort of tar “bleed through”- there are granules underneath. I have seen many shingles in various states but never anything like this.

We had a major hail storm here in San Antonio a few years ago that took out a good portion of roofs. This was a total tear off, (to the sheathing) and is about three years old. I wonder if this is a normal occurrence, a factory defect or if the roofer was cutting costs and used factory defects. He knew the owner would never crawl up on the roof.

Any constructive thoughts would be helpful.

I know I am supposed to have a clever signature but got nothing.

Taylor Steele

TREC 23366

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(Dominic DAgostino, CMI HI3957) #2

It’s not a defect, it’s a design.
The product has no traditional cuts or tabs, and is supposed to look like a laminated shingle.

Here is one example from CertainTeed:
Patriot - Residential Roofing - CertainTeed

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(Bradley K. Toye, CMI) #3

Those are shadowing lines. Are those one-tab strip shingles? Fairly rare, but not a defect.

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(Taylor Steele, TREC Lisence #23366) #4

Yup. Now I see it. The lack of tabs should have been a give away.

Thanks!

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(Kenton Shepard, CMI) #5

…Unless those dark areas are the sealant strips. Typical exposure is 5 1/2 ". Looks like that is quite a bit more. But I think Brad and Dominic are right.

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(Taylor Steele, TREC Lisence #23366) #6

I thought that too and measured the exposure, it was right at 5 1/4". So yes, I think that you are right that Brad and Dominic are right. I didn’t even notice that they were a single tab shingle until Dominic pointed it out. I was up on the roof for a good hour saying to myself “something just doesn’t look right”. Glad it was a practice inspection. :slight_smile:

Thank you for your input.
Thank all of you for your help!

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