Thoughts on this?

The water heater was recently installed, and the TRR was tied into the condensate for A/C. This may be reaching, but is their potential for the “hot” release from water heater to affect the A/C.

The TPR valve discharge/extension pipe cannot have a tee or anything else attached to it…

http://www.waterheaterexplosions.com/R_IRC_Codes.html
P2803.6.1 Requirements for discharge pipe.
The discharge piping serving a pressure-relief valve, temperature- relief valve or combination valve shall:

    1. Not be directly connected to the drainage system.
    1. Discharge through an air gap located in the same room as the water heater.
    1. Not be smaller than the diameter of the outlet of the valve served and shall discharge full size to the air gap.
    1. Serve a single relief device and shall not connect to piping serving any other relief device or equipment.
    1. Discharge to the floor, to an indirect waste receptor or to the outdoors. Where discharging to the outdoors in areas subject to freezing, discharge piping shall be first piped to an indirect waste receptor through an air gap located in a conditioned area.
    1. Discharge in a manner that does not cause personal injury or structural damage.
    1. Discharge to a termination point that is readily observable by the building occupants.
    1. Not be trapped.
    1. Be installed to flow by gravity.
    1. Not terminate more than 6 inches (152 mm) above the floor or waste receptor.
    1. Not have a threaded connection at the end of the piping.
    1. Not have valves or tee fittings.
    1. Be constructed of those materials listed in Section P2904.5 or materials tested, rated and approved for such use in accordance with ASME A112.4.1.

Perfect! Thank you both for the response/link. Very helpful!

Are you putting a pressure test of the water heater gas valve?

A discharge pipe should:

  1. be constructed of an approved material, such as CPVC, copper, polyethylene, galvanized steel, polypropylene, or stainless steel. PVC and other non-approved plastics should not be used since they can easily melt.
  2. not be smaller than the diameter of the outlet of the valve it serves (usually no smaller than 3/4").
  3. not reduce in size from the valve to the air gap (point of discharge).
  4. be as short and as straight as possible so as to avoid undue stress on the valve.
  5. be installed so as to drain by flow of gravity.
  6. not be trapped, since standing water may become contaminated and backflow into the potable water.
  7. discharge to a floor drain, to an indirect waste receptor, or to the outdoors.
  8. not be directly connected to the drainage system to prevent backflow of potentially contaminating the potable water.
  9. discharge through a visible air gap in the same room as the water-heating appliance.
  10. be first piped to an indirect waste receptor such as a bucket through an air gap located in a heated area when discharging to the outdoors in areas subject to freezing, since freezing water could block the pipe.
  11. not terminate more than 6 inches (152 mm) above the floor or waste receptor.
  12. discharge in a manner that could not cause scalding.
  13. discharge in a manner that could not cause structural or property damage.
  14. discharge to a termination point that is readily observable by occupants, because discharge indicates that something is wrong, and to prevent unobserved termination capping.
  15. be piped independently of other equipment drains, water heater pans, or relief valve discharge piping to the point of discharge.
  16. not have valves anywhere.
  17. not have tee fittings.
  18. not have a threaded connection at the end of the pipe so as to avoid capping.

From TPR Valves and Discharge Piping - InterNACHI http://www.nachi.org/tpr-valves-discharge-piping.htm

was there another TPRV in the line or on the tank anywhere?