Uncharacteristic Wear. What's this?

Any of you guys seen wear like this? If so can you tell me what’s going on here? 10-12-year-old


Where are you located?

In Minnesota, I see it caused by the heavy snow and ice loads moving down the roof.
Think a glacier scrubbing the earth as it moves downhill.

Looks like a bad bundle of shingles…looks like a manufacture defect. The top tab is not damaged and the lower tab is very uniform.

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Exact opposite on my home. The top is worn, while the bottom is mostly unworn.

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If so, why is it not on the raised parts of the shingle? What is above the damaged shingles? Is it isolated to one area of the roof?

It’s stepped sections just like the pattern when installed. No whole roof some are fine others not but in groups.

Makes sense except we don’t get snow or ice.

Defective shingles.

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That’s what I’m thinking. It’s in stepped groups just like when installing.

Boise Idaho

I concur with Scott.

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I would go with a bad batch of shingles

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Just call it granule loss, exposed fiberglass matt and leave it at that. Monitor for further deterioration and replace defective shingles.

When unsure of the cause, diagnosis is for personal curiosity and not a component of the report to the client. You can easily be wrong on your diagnosis. I have extensive building experience, and often I cannot figure out the cause of the defect during an inspection. I leave the observation as just that, an observation.

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“Unusual granule loss on edges of shingles may be a manufacturer’s defect. A qualified roofer should evaluate the shingles.”

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