A camera designed for home inspectors, by home inspectors!

What I do not particularly like about this type of plumbing vent to sewer line boar scope, it does not scour and clean the pipe as you work the lens to the sewer. You can miss pipe fractures and fissures hidden with soup scum, grease, sludge and other inner pipe wall buildup in drain /waste*/vent (DWV) piping made of iron or steel.

What camera do you use Martin?

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Welcome to our forum, Gaetano!..Enjoy! :smile:

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There are many cameras between the $500-$1000 price range that will perform very well for a home inspector. If you only do one sewer inspection a week or a month it will not take long to cover your investment.

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This is my favorite and works very well.
Eyoyo Pipe Pipeline Inspection Camera 30M/100ft Drain Sewer Industrial Endoscope Video Plumbing System with 7 Inch LCD Monitor 1000TVL DVR Recorder Snake Cam (Include 8GB SD Card) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JVM326Q/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_RB8AVK444VK3GM53J8NX?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

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Martin,

Would you share what you charge for scoping the sewer lines and do you offer both as an ancillary inspection and stand alone service?
70% of my inspections include inspecting the septic system and I defer the client to a septic service company.
Maybe time to change that.

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Scott I charge $195 for sewer scoping during the home inspection. I don’t offer it as a stand alone service.

It takes about 30 minutes and a HD video with comments is sent to the client with their inspection report.

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Scott, don’t confuse “septic inspections” with “lateral sewer line inspections”. Different animals.

Personally, I have a plumber that I sub-out all my lateral inspections too. There have been times where a clean-out either wasn’t found, or the cover had to be torched off to remove it. The case where the cleanout couldn’t be found a toilet was removed to scope there, with the sellers permission of course. The last scope he did for me he had to cut the clean-out cap into pieces with a torch to get it out.

Then there’s the actual scope, you or in my case, my Plumber needs to know what it is you’re looking at and how to report it. I actually have a separate template/report set up in my software for lateral inspections. I report the type of materials, any mis-match or damage viewed, roots, clogs, etc. and include pictures of the scope that are time and date stamped and signed by the plumber.

IMO this is a job for a Plumber, not a HI.

I don’t carry tools or wax rings to R&R toilets, and I don’t carry a torch to cut or heat a cleanout cap to remove it if needed, nor do I carry an array or clean-out caps, and many times it is needed, especially in older homes, which are in most cases the ones getting the lateral inspected.

Also, if you do these types of inspections yourself, be sure you verify with your E&O carrier that you’re covered. CYA!!

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Thank you Martin.

Kevin,
I understand the difference between a septic inspection and lateral sewer line inspections. That said, this isn’t my first rodeo.

I appreciate the note of caution and yep, know what it means when there isn’t access and what it would take to get into the line leading out of the house/structure to a septic system.

This may not be something to pursue but it sure could be a way to carefully add to ones overall sales.

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Thanks a bunch for the response! I’ve been asked 3 times this past month so I figured I’d look in to getting one but like you said 6000 dollars is not a good margin. Enjoy your day!

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Hi Scott, although it was not my intent, I came off as condescending.

I apologize for that.

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No worries man.

This will take some thought, if I decide to press ahead.
The longer I’m in this business the more thought/effort I give to separating myself from my competition.
However, not at the expense of extra headaches.

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