Become an InterNACHI® Certified Condo Inspector

Become an InterNACHI® Certified Condo Inspector. It’s free and online for InterNACHI® members. The training and certification is provided by the only home inspector college – InterNACHI® School at www.internachi.edu.

condo inspector certification

A condominium (or “condo”) is a privately owned dwelling unit within a community of other units. The homeowner usually owns the interior of their condo and the structural components of the exterior walls. The homeowner jointly owns shared common areas within the community, such as roofs, garages, elevators, and outside hallways. A homeowners association typically manages the common areas.

4 Likes

I’m down with this course. Thanks for offering it.

2 Likes

So there is no additional class to take? Just the basic CPI stuff?

1 Like

Was wondering the same thing. Is this a course in itself? Doesn’t link to one.

Need to find a way to incorporate Bob into that logo.

2 Likes

Is it just me? I could not find a link to this course on the OP post, nor when searching the courses.

First item, wondering how many credits it is.

Correct, @imayer. It’s similar to the requirements to using the Residential Property Inspector logo at https://www.nachi.org/logos#residential-property-inspector.

2 Likes

Great idea, Ben.
Certified Condo Inspector
I greatly appreciate the certification. I suspect a dash of commercial prerequisite is mixed in.

To inspect a condominium building, I recommend https://ccpia.org/.

Biggest issue with condo/townhouse is trying to figure out what the HOA covers and if a 4pt/wind mitigation insurance inspection is required.

I do neither of these. The last thing I want to do is be responsible for the by-laws or insurability. Define your scope. For example, hi-rise condo could be the interior of the unit only. Exclude common areas etc. On townhomes, I do all of it to include the party wall. I will let the client and the realtor sort out what is the buyers responsibilities.

2 Likes

The insurance company will have their own in-house guidelines on those details, best just to treat it like any other inspection. Half the time no one has any idea until the underwriter asks for it weeks later.

If the client didn’t initially order those insurance reports, I collect the required photos & data anyway to process them later if necessary.