Brand new roof, what a shame

(Eli Klugmann) #1

Brand new roof, new construction. How to describe this mess?

(Dave Range, CMI) #2

What are your concerns?

(Eli Klugmann) #3

Valley looks awful to me. Shingle courses are irregular. Shingles over ridge are bumped up and cracking. I wrote this up as really bad.
Am I wrong? Thanks for your help.

(Eli Klugmann) #4

I am trying to finish this report. Can anyone chime in and give me some input? I just want confirmation of my comments in my report that it’s very unprofessional installation.
Thank you

(Barry Adair, TREC#4563 EIFSTX#39) #5

i never comment on “professionalism”
just identify & comment on the 6+ deficiencies/defects observed
it’s not just the shingles based your pix

if you don’t know call me

(Marcel R. Cyr, CMI) #6

Confirmed.
There is no defect there other than a piss poor installation of the valley and hump under the ridge cap that we can’t see what is causing it.

(Paul Lesieur, CMI) #7

Yeah, I don’t see 6 defects. All I see is unprofessional work which would meet the standard “workmanlike way”. At least they finished it.

6 defects?

(Eli Klugmann) #8

Thanks guys, it’s great to have you all available to give needed advice and input and to give your time.

(Ian W. Mayer, CMI) #9

It’s what I call a Home Depot special.

Someone walked into Home Depot, bought some shingles, walked outside, found a few people standing in front, and said: “here, install these for me…”

(Chuck Evans, CMI TREC 7657) #10

Pick out and comment on each individual deficiency in turn as an individual item in your report.

(Paul Lesieur, CMI) #11

Chuck, is sloppy work a deficiency? I use the word deficient sparingly and on roofing, siding, windows etc I like to use “not installed according to manufacturers specifications”. Of course you need to know what the manufacturers specs are.

Just saying.

(Chuck Evans, CMI TREC 7657) #12
  • The valley cut is ragged and should be offset two inches out of the center of the valley.
  • There are exposed fasteners
  • There are torn/damaged shingles
  • There is debris left on the roof
  • There is foreign material (possibly remnants of a tie-off) under the ridge which may stress/damage the shingles
  • There is inconsistent/improper shingle exposure in the courses
  • The downspout discharges onto the roof surface.
  • There is something loose at the sidewall ???
  • There are tree limbs in contact with the roof that should be cut back
  • There are one or more fishmouths due to improperly driven fasteners

Anything that is not done properly is “deficient”. If the installation is not done to the manufacturer’s installation standards, then the installation is “deficient”. Sloppy work manifests itself through its deficiencies. If the inspector simply reports the installation as sloppy or unworkmanlike, it doesn’t give the client a lot to go on in dealing with the contractor and the contractor simply states “Well that’s just your inspector’s opinion”. The inspector needs to provide the details that support the assertion.

1 Like
(Robert Young) #13

Amatuer workmanship.
1: Did not follow the manufacturer’s installation recommendation will affect any expressed warranty.
2: Trimmed Valley Shingles overlap. Path for water to disperse under the shingles.
3: Trimmed and Woven shingles at the valley.
4: Wavy horizontal courses.
5: Abutwall clearance. No gap between Roof deck covering and siding.
Just getting started.
Any more pics?

(Paul Lesieur, CMI) #14

I see worse than that, we all do. My favorite was driving by a roof job and saw they started at the top and worked down? I was a contractor working a couple of streets over on my fully permitted job.

Its a shame really. We need to get back to an apprentice system. I shoveled, broomed and cleaned before I was allowed to hold a tool. My first trim job my boss let me trim the inside of a hall closet. One of the proudest moments of my life, I was a carpenter! (Well beginning to be a carpenter). :|.)

(Ryan M. Fessler, HI10797) #15

i just wish i saw roofs like this on a regular basis. This one obviously has some defects but you act like its some kind of nightmare. Just let the client know the issues with the valley, ridge, fasteners, downspout, etc. A lot of this is easy to repair. Remind them of this :slight_smile:

(Eli Klugmann) #16

Hi Ryan,
True, I just thought it was a shame that a brand new home had such a shoddy roof.
The rest of the house was well built.

(Larry J. Michael) #17

Agreed, that is horrible for a new roof.

(John Paul de Oliveira, GB-2 #86934 / AB #44580) #18

You are the man Chuck.

Robert:shock: is right about the roof to siding junction. Step flashing? In addition there was no apron flashing.

To install this roof correctly, sections need to be torn off and reinstalled. Shingles should be flush with the roof sheathing or they prematurely age.

:roll:

Do you REALLY consider all of the above, and working off a pitched 2 story roof easy? Roofers here would charge $1,200-$2,000 (I know, we have low rates in NM). That is how you are advocating for your clients interests?:roll:

(Robert Young) #19

Morning, John hope to find you well and in good health today.:slight_smile:

I try my best to insure there is a gap between 11/2’ - 2" at wall abuts when inspecting roofs with abutwalls or firebreak curbs.

The roof deck, and sheathing will move independently, hygroscopicus and temperature, from the structure, as you are aware.

Chuck nailed it so to speak, not the shingles. Chuck’s the best.

You sir, correctly identified a lack of apron wall flashing.

At the roof deck, abutwall/wallabut intersections, step flashing should be visual, unless mastic impedes the sheet metal from visually being ascertained or counterflashing.
As well, in most cases step flashing is plainly visible under most or all shingles unless again, counter flashing prevents visibility.
The thickness/gauge of the sheet metal is visual when looked for under the tab or strip. A slight rise of the step flashing below.

Best regards.
Robert’s back.:slight_smile:

(Kenton Shepard, CMI) #20

Tug on the cap shingles where you see some loose. Installers should use longer nails in order to nail caps to the roof deck. If they use the same nails they use for field shingles, they’re often too short and you’ll see ridge cap shingles coming loose.

Fishmouth can also indicate failed bonding, especially if you see it where shingles bridge joints between shingles in the course immediately below, since that’s where bonds always fail first.