Contractors in the business

(John Shishilla) #1

I think it is time that Licensed Inspectors realize that Licensed Contractors are in this business because inspectors were not licensed. The state created a demand for Licensed contractors to do Wind Mitigation, roof and four point inspections. The natural progression would be to add home inspections. They then progress to include other including WDO, IR and mold ect.

This is unfortunate for Full Home Inspectors, but contractors did not start this the state did. Unfortunately, home inspectors that did not have a license, had no piece of paper to hold up and say they are qualified. You can be mad at contractors and think that they are all out just trying or get side work. I believe that most are not trying to do that. When you look at the economy you can assume that many of them are doing inspections to just stay afloat. I do not think you should be making assumptions about all or most of a group because they have additional qualifications.

Now that HIs are getting licensed some of this will change. The economy will improve, some contractors will go back to what they were doing, others will stay. Some HIs will move to doing something else.

Making blanket statements about contractors is wrong and shows ignorance. It is no better than assuming a HI just needs a flashlight, a ladder and no other qualifications to do a Home Inspection.

HIs should be aligning with contractors to insure that the business stays ethical and righteous. Contractors are better organized and have the home court advantage in this state. Many contractors need guidance on the inspection end, alienating them will send them to their own for training and mentoring. Do you really want a contractor teaching another how to do a home inspection and that being a standard? This is exactly what is happening.

Stepping off the box now, thanks for listening.

(Michael J. Meeker, CMI) #2

Today I must agree with you.

Well said.

(Gordon R. Marchant, HI-298) #3

John well said. I feel that if this is supposed to be a professional board then everyone should act as professionals. There are good and bad in every group and we can all learn from each other. The bad ones will fall by the wayside and the strong will survive. Also caution to the bashers that in the public areas they can be seen by all and their business and reputation may be tarnished.

(Dennis P. Quigley) #4

Hands clapping — Tail wagging — Hitting “Like” button

(Joseph Burkeson, CMI) #5

Anyone who thinks that a wind mitigation, roof or four-point survey is equal to a home inspection is in for a very rude awakening and has no clue who their client is or what talent is necessary to be successful in this profession.

The old adage stands the test of time once again… When your only tool is a hammer, all problems encountered take on the appearance of nails. Swing away. :wink:

(Michael J. Meeker, CMI) #6

Let me guess, many years ago you could not pass the test.

What did you do before you became a “know it all home” inspector or did you just pop out of Momma flashlight in hand ready to pick apart other’s work?

(John Shishilla) #7

I do not think anyone here implied that. If fact some contractors(me) have even told the State that the contractor schools do not even know how to teach how to do a home inspection.

Once again push contractors further away and they will learn somewhere else. Your choice.

(Michael J. Meeker, CMI) #8

That one will never get it.

(James H. Bushart) #9

Perhaps you guys would do better to convince Nick to form a National Association of Licensed Contractors. Until you do, you are members of an association that promotes and highlights professional home inspectors.

Florida’s unusual quirk not withstanding…professional inspectors write inspection reports and contractors write bids…and call them inspection reports.

(Michael J. Meeker, CMI) #10

Contractors are businessmen they do whatever it takes. Most prefer to work with their heads when possible.

(John Shishilla) #11

Says you.
Contractors were doing inspections when this industry started, but it has grown and changed.

I offer the the experience of a LICENSED contractor and Licensed Home inspector and Licensed Claims Adjuster. My clients would rather have someone who can build a house, not just one who can complain how it was done. You should see that as a marketing angle. I do not have a CMI, which is a marketing angle.

Does any of these make either of us any better… Maybe, maybe not, it is how you market it to YOUR clients.

Dividing yourself from contractors in this forum will only make HIs weaker. Which was my point.

(Michael J. Meeker, CMI) #12

Damn you’re on a roll tonight. I agree with everything again. :smiley:

(James H. Bushart) #13

Yep. I certainly do.

To as many as possible…and as often as the opportunity presents itself…by whatever media is available to me.

(Dennis J. Bonner) #14

John you ,must be doing something right for how many HOME inspections you have this week( For a boot!)

(John Shishilla) #15

Some just do not get it. You can lead them to water.

They do not understand I am trying to help US ALL!

(Gary Farnsworth, CMI) #16

Contractors do inspections for one reason: money. They do repairs on defects they find, needed or not. This, IMO, is a huge conflict of interest when it comes to the consumer. Inspectors should not perform, or recommend other people, repairs on homes that they inspect. Ethics.

Oh, I forgot. Lawmakers do not have any ethics either. If it is a way of life for them, then I guess they assume that it is a way of life for contractors. To heck with the consumers.

Ghessh. I am so positive lately.

(Russell J. Hensel) #17

Well I do agree that blanket statements do not work. As always, there are exceptions to the rules. We have some of those exceptions right here on this thread.

But, I do see where the other guys are coming from (inspectors). Most think because they passed a test and became a GC they can inspect a home. I know you guys are not saying that, but there are many who do.

All I know is that I am going to surround myself with the best professionals in Florida. See what they have to offer, help each other and watch that bank account grow, by providing superior services with a superior people having a Superior support staff. Be it a contractor or inspector…I could care less as long as the professionalism is there.

(Brian C. Hoagland) #18

The addittional qualification (STATE lisenced contractor) you mentioned has nothing to do with this field of endeavor. State lisencing of home inspectors will not improve the quality of the inspection work done but over time possibly might weed out a few bad apples. The COE and SOP the state enforces will likely be as weak as the requirements for lisencing for home inspectors leaving many to view this industry with disdain for years to come. The fact that inspectors have an attitude that they are any better than a contractor baffles me. They are not. They may be better than some and not as good as others same as with their peers in home inspection. I have worked for engineers, I have worked for contractors I have some of each that occasionally call me for an opinion regarding code matters. There is good and bad in everything, If anyone thinks they can climb to the top by stepping on others they may find the fall most precipitous. My mom taught me to say nothing if I had nothing good to say, apparently she didn’t know many realtors.

(John Shishilla) #19

Contractors doing work is a conflict that is agreed but you assume that is what they are doing.

Making my point blanket statements is also wrong and not very helpful.

(John Shishilla) #20

Well said, for a smart @ss :stuck_out_tongue:

Key word for those that missed it **professionalism **