Copper Tubing Was Used to Replace Fuses

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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See anything else here? icon_rolleyes.gif







--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Brian A. Goodman
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There’s no ground.


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Thanks Brian:


I saw that too, but I was also wondering if it was a normal practice or procedure for a Home Inspector to open the door on the switch?

The entire pullout is missing, and there may be other problems associated with this installation if we continue to list them.


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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I pull the covers, but I almost never find a fused disconnect at the condensing unit. Most always it is a 60 amp no trip breaker or a non fused pull out, with the actual breaker in the service panel.


Was this protected at the service panel?


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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bwiley wrote:
I pull the covers, but I almost never find a fused disconnect at the condensing unit. Most always it is a 60 amp no trip breaker or a non fused pull out, with the actual breaker in the service panel.

Was this protected at the service panel?


Blaine:

I did not take this picture. This unit was supplied by a branch circuit and we would probably find it originating in the main or sub panel.

I think we can agree that a HACR circuit breaker would be required if the label permitted it for protection of this equipment in addition to fuses.


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: rfarruggia
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It appears that this is type L copper piping.


Everyone know that type M piping is the perferred material for this application.

The missing pullout can easily be replaced by shoving pennies into the opening. But be sure to use only pennies dated 1982 or before. After 1982, the mint made pennies out of zinc with only a copper covering.

This compressor can be tested for safety by firmly grasping all accessable contact points with both hands (use feet and genitalia too, if necessary) while operating the unit. It should not cause a shock if you have your lucky rabbits foot nearby.

I always tell my customers to use the higest quality materials available. Using lesser quality materials as in this application indicates unprofessional workmanship. The professional who installed this should be called back to replace the pipe.


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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I would never pass this as the required disconnect, even if it was legally wired with real fuses in it.


Where IS the “switch” or disconnecting means?


Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Looks like the pull out disconnect is sitting in the dead front cover on top of the A/C unit.


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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I didn’t see the pullout and Joe’s site is down so I am not seeing the picture now. The fuses are not required in a disconnect and we have to believe tyhe branch circuit is protected at the other end … but you should look.


That leaves us with the missing ground. How long was the FMC whip?


Originally Posted By: bbadger
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What about 225.22 Raceways shall be arranged to drain. icon_wink.gif


Originally Posted By: A Faxon
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icon_rolleyes.gif Bob, there is drainage their. The concentric knockouts are breaking out for water flow. When they totally break out you will have conductors in free air. Won’t have to derate then.


Reminds me of the disconnect switch on an a/c unit I found. The electrician ran out of 30 amp fuses so he cut pieces of a ground rod to fit.


Originally Posted By: tvargas
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I believe there should also be a slab or some sort of base underneath that


condenser unit to keep level . It should be slanted slightly away from the house to allow proper drainage for condensation. No one has mention this


correct me if I am wrong.


Tony


Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Well if we’re going to get picky on the Harry Homeowner installation, there’s a bunch of Rubatex missing from the suction line, too.