Costco Drugs

Received this email & thought I would post it here. It was checked out through Snopes.

Costco - Unbelievable!

[FONT=Arial]Story verified[/FONT][FONT=Arial]@[/FONT][FONT=Arial]http://www.snopes.com/medical/drugs/generic.asp](http://www.snopes.com/medical/drugs/generic.asp)[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial]Make sure you read to the end. You will be amazed.[/FONT]
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[/FONT]***[FONT=Arial]Let’s hear it for Costco! (This is just mind-boggling!)***[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial]Make sure you read all the way past the list of the drugs. The woman that signed below is a Budget Analyst out of federal Washington , DC offices.***[/FONT]
**
[FONT=Arial]Did you ever wonder how much it costs a drug company for the active ingredient in prescription medications? Some people think it must cost a lot, since many drugs sell for more than $2.00 per tablet. We did a search of offshore chemical synthesizers that supply the active ingredients found in drugs approved by the FDA. As we have revealed in past issues of Life Extension a significant percentage of drugs sold in the United States contain active ingredients made in other countries. In our independent investigation of how much profit drug companies really make, we obtained the actual price of active ingredients used in some of the most popular drugs sold in America . [/FONT]
**
[FONT=Arial]Celebrex:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]100 mg[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $130.27
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.60
Percent markup: 21,712%[/FONT]
*
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Claritin:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]10 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer Price (100 tablets): $215.17
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.71
Percent markup: 30,306%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Keflex:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]250 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer Price (100 tablets): $157.39
Cost of general active ingredients: $1.88
Percent markup: 8,372%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Lipitor:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]20 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer Price (100 tablets): $272.37
Cost of general active ingredients: $5.80
Percent markup: 4,696%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Norvasc:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]10 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $188.29
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.14
Percent markup: 134,493%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Paxil:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]20 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $220.27
Cost of general active ingredients: $7.60
Percent markup: 2,898%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Prevacid:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]30 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $44.77
Cost of general active ingredients: $1.01
Percent markup: 34,136%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Prilosec[/FONT][FONT=Arial]: 20 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $360.97
Cost of general active ingredients $0.52
Percent markup: 69,417%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Prozac:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]20 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets) : $247.47
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.11
Percent markup: 224,973%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Tenormin:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]50 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $104.47
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.13
Percent markup: 80,362%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Vasotec:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]10 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $102.37
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.20
Percent markup: 51,185%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Xanax:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]1 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets) : $136.79
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.024
Percent markup: 569,958%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Zestril:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]20 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets) $89.89
Cost of general active ingredients $3.20
Percent markup: 2,809%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Zithromax:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]600 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $1,482.19
Cost of general active ingredients: $18.78
Percent markup: 7,892%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT]**
[FONT=Arial]Zocor:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]40 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price (100 tablets): $350.27
Cost of general active ingredients: $8.63
Percent markup: 4,059%[/FONT]**
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[/FONT][FONT=Arial]Zoloft:[/FONT][FONT=Arial]50 mg[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial]Consumer price: $206.87
Cost of general active ingredients: $1.75
Percent markup: 11,821%[/FONT]

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[/FONT]**
**[FONT=Arial]Since the cost of prescription drugs is so outrageous, I thought everyone should know about this. **
It pays to shop around! This helps to solve the mystery as to why they can afford to put a Walgreen’s on every corner. On Monday night, Steve Wilson, an investigative reporter for Channel 7 News in Detroit , did a story on generic drug prices gouging by pharmacies. He found in his investigation that some of these generic drugs were marked up as much as 3,000% or more. So often we blame the drug companies for the high cost of drugs, and usually rightfully so. But in this case, the fault clearly lies with the pharmacies themselves. For example if you had to buy a prescription drug, and bought the name brand, you might pay $100 for 100 pills.
The pharmacist might tell you that if you get the generic equivalent, they would only cost $80, making you think you are saving $20. What the pharmacist is not telling you is that those 100 generic pills may have only cost him $10!

At the end of the report, one of the anchors asked Mr. Wilson whether or not there were any pharmacies that did not adhere to this practice, and he said that Costco consistently charged little over their cost for the generic drugs.
**

**

I went to the Costco site, where you can look up any drug, and get its online price. It says that the in-store prices are consistent with the online prices. I was appalled. Just to give you one example from my own experience I had to use the drug Compazine which helps prevent nausea in chemo patients.
**

**
I used the generic equivalent, which cost $54.99 for 60 pills at CVS. I checked the price at Costco, and I could have bought 100 pills for $19.89. For 145 of my pain pills, I paid $72.57. I could have got 150 at Costco for $28.08.

**I would like to mention, that although Costco is a ‘membership’ type store, you do NOT have to be a member to buy prescriptions there as it is a federally regulated substance. You just tell them at the door that you wish to use the pharmacy, and they will let you in. **

I am asking each of you to please help me by copying this letter, and passing it into your own e-mail, and send it to everyone you know with an e-mail address.
[/FONT]****
[FONT=Arial]Sharon L. Davis
Budget Analyst
U.S. Department of Commerce
Room 6839
Office Ph: 202-482-4458
Office Fax: 202-482-5480
E-mail Address:sdavis@doc.gov](http://us.mc535.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=sdavis@doc.gov)[/FONT]****
**[FONT=Arial]

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[FONT=Arial]DON’T THINK . DON’T SPEAK . MOVE![/FONT]

You might want to consider adding in a bit for research, drug trials, FDA compliance and all that little stuff.:roll::roll:

Did you read all the way to the end of the snopes entry?

I understand that R&D is not cheap. More than anything this is about price comparisons. http://web.archive.org/web/20050326070849/web.wxyz.com/extras/040205-drugchart.html :roll::roll::roll:

lol that is why the same stuff is about 50% cheaper in Canada inst it. Of course they do not do any research there.

Generic Drug Prices in the U.S. Are Lower
Than Drug Prices in Canada

so why is everyone getting on the bus’s to get their grugs filled there?

I see your article with this article

Because grugs are very expensive in the U.S. and rare.

HEHE ok drugs it is early you know
But grugs are cheaper too

I don’t know Wayne.

That FDA study was for generics.

Maybe name brands are lower in Canada.

Doesn’t Canada set the price anyway?

Not sure about them setting prices for grugs but Drugs they don’t set the price I think but Control I think in Canada after the first year it is out they can produce a generic . Which brings the price down

Don’t you think this article - Office of Planning November 2003 & the chart they show - Based on 2002 prices - is just a bit dated.

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/42/23/12-a#FIG1

If you have something more recent comparing Canadian and U.S. drug pricing please post it.

Prescription drug prices in the United States are the highest in the world. "The prices Americans pay for prescription drugs, which are far higher than those paid by citizens of any other developed country, help explain why the pharmaceutical industry is — and has been for years — the most profitable of all businesses in the U.S. In the annual Fortune 500 survey, the pharmaceutical industry topped the list of the most profitable industries, with a return of 17% on revenue

Critics of pharmaceutical companies (That would be US pharmaceutical companies) point out that only a small portion of the drug companies’ expenditures are used for research and development, with the majority of their money being spent in the areas of marketing and administration.

It’s not a comparison chart but…

“[FONT=Verdana][size=1][FONT=Arial][size=2]The average cost, a 2003 study published in The Journal of Health Economics shows, can be as much as $800 million”[/size][/FONT][/FONT][/size]

That’s for one drug. Doesn’t sound small to me. ML

[FONT=Verdana][FONT=Arial]What do we get for the higher prices we pay? We get such drugs as Byetta. Introduced last year by Amylin Pharmaceuticals and Eli Lilly, this anti-diabetic drug works in a different way than insulin does - and without some of the side effects, such as weight gain, that lead many patients to take less-than-prescribed doses of the medication.[/FONT][/FONT]

August 15, 2006
Don’t kill off life-saving drugs

Forgot this little tid-bit of information.

The pharmaceutical industry spent $855 million, more than any other industry, on lobbying activities from 1998 to 2006, according to the non-partisan Center for Public Integrity

That’s less than the cost of bring one drug to market(inflation adjusted)

Ask yourself why they spend so much money lobbying.

My guess is to keep the government off their backs.

The do gooder pols love to beat up on the big pharma.

Oh, the poor drug companies.

ScienceDaily (Jan. 7, 2008) — A new study by two York University researchers estimates the U.S. pharmaceutical industry spends almost twice as much on promotion as it does on research and development, contrary to the industry’s claim.

The researchers’ estimate is based on the systematic collection of data directly from the industry and doctors during 2004, which shows the U.S. pharmaceutical industry spent 24.4% of the sales dollar on promotion, versus 13.4% for research and development, as a percentage of US domestic sales of US$235.4 billion.