Electrical safety is the name of the game!

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



http://www.nfpa.org/tutor/html/module2/content_pages/intro01.htm


Introduction

When working with electricity, safety is the name of the game.

This tutorial is based on NFPA 70E (Standard for Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplaces). NFPA 70E addresses safety procedures necessary to safeguard employees during installation or maintenance of electrical equipment.

It's more than just following accepted safety practices (although that is of the utmost importance too). It is also a matter of wearing appropriate personal protective equipment.

No matter how insignificant a task may seem, you must always

    First, determine if personal protective equipment is required, and
    Then, wear it to protect yourself from arc-flash and shock hazards.



--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: rcloyd
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Joe:


Can you post a list of Electrical PPE that no home inpsector should be without?

Thanks,


--
Russell G. Cloyd
Intra-Spec Home Inspections
& Code Consulting, LLC
859-586-4591
www.intra-spechomeinspections.com

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Joe,


Can you also please post the number of home inspector accidents known to occur each year by the home inspector removing the panel cover, vs. the total number of home inspections performed in the US? I think this would help to quantify the need for PPE on a home inspector.


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Blaine:


Some of the members have asked the same question in the past.

I cannot give any immediate summary of the number of Home Inspectors who have been hurt, or who have lost their life during an inspection of any part of the building electrical system, not just at the panelboard.

They posted their experiences here on this board, and they can be searched by anyone who wants to find out.

I will try to find out, and hope that others in this industry will come forward and tell their story again. I have received messages from a few who were planning to look into getting PPE.

If only 1% of the 50,000 + - Home Inspectors in the USA were saved by wearing safety glasses, gloves, and shoes and fire resistant clothing, I would feel that it was worth the effort by them, or on behalf of their employer.

May God Bless those who were not so lucky!

rc:

As far as a list of items. I have already posted replies to messages in the space on the very top forum for members that included links and suggestions.

If a search through Google were to be tried, looking for V rated gloves there will be many links available.

I have made some mistakes in my life and the ones that stay close to my mind are the electrical shocks I received in a dwelling basement, and when changing a ballast.

I have also helped a few video companies prepare their material for safety videos so I guess that my mind is set in its ways - electrical safety is an important part of what I am all about, and I don't think that my concerns will ever change.

I also have collected many images of accident victims.

I will be in Las Vegas at the DOE Electrical Safety Meeting at the end of this month and will be a presenter and will also sit and listen to many other in my field tell their stories.

Please let me know if I can answer any more questions.

![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I can only speak for my training (as those who were in my class) way back in 1995. I know that we spent a great deal of time while in the electrical portion of the inspection about safety, how to carefully and properly remove the cover(s), watch for abandoned, worn or exposed equipment or wiring, etc. We were also told that when in ANY doubt about the safety of inspecting a panel, to refer to a qualified licensed electrician. I think common sense was also stressed, and we should all be guided by it.


Originally Posted By: roconnor
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bwiley wrote:
I think common sense was also stressed, and we should all be guided by it.

In addition to the training, a little common sence goes a long way ... ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


--
Robert O'Connor, PE
Eagle Engineering ?
Eagle Eye Inspections ?
NACHI Education Committee

I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong