Hardie siding fasteners

New Construction.
What i see is face nailing and over driven, but not familiar with fastener type.
Can you tell if these are the appropriate fastener?
Are these staples or nails? From what i have found researching is Nails or screws can be used. Fasteners must be
corrosion resistant, galvanized or stainless steel.

It looks like a T nail? not sure if it is an approved fastener for the type of siding.

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Looks like they probably did “double nailing” hidden nails and then corner “pin” nailing. Those corner nails need to be a solid inch from the edges or they will surely crack. And yep, over driven.

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MFG states on 3/8 inch is needed

Which manufacturer? James Hardie? I know they recommend 3/8, but my in the field experience says 1" all day long :smile:

Other factors effect this corner nailing as well such as nominal butt joint spacing and the end gap at the corner trim. In my experience, most installers install this material way too tight. End result, popping and cracking. Those over driven fasteners will also allow the siding to pop off the wall.

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Yes James Hardie, I don’t disagree with you but just stating what the MFG states.
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I am referencing pin-backs which is covered here and which is shown in your photo from what I can see. I think this may correct my statement and clarify the issue. (note: This is HZ-10. I think Kentucky is HZ-5 which may be different)

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Yes, we are HZ 5 and the graphic i shared is from the instructions from this zone.
Interesting that the video shown for pin-back nailing does not appear to place nail 1 inch away. I am not arguing Brian or disagreeing, just find it interesting on what and where you find information on the Web.
How to Pin-Back Corners with HardiePlank® Lap Siding - Bing video

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Same here, my intent only to broaden both of our understanding.

Here is my source material. I have downloaded the newest version for you in HZ-5. Please go to page 88.

intro-tools-hz5-us-en.pdf (62.2 MB)

Here is the link
https://www.jameshardiepros.com/install-and-tech-docs/browsetechdocs?doctype=Best%20Practice%20Guide

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BTW, I edited my previous post with better information.

Same here Brian.

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I know this is late to the game, but it looks like they face nailed some corners for a more flat appearance at edges and it looks like they used a finish nailer and the piston driver indented the siding. I see it frequently.
If exposed to sun, it will likely crack corners as the siding expands and contracts.
I would recommend that all exposed nail holes be back filled with caulk to prevent moisture intrusion. Not a whole lot else that can be done on it at this point. It would also require paint to be applied to cover all caulked over penetrations.

James Hardie does provide a cure for an over driven fastener or slanted fastener. (including your caulk recommendation)

Counter sink (on slanted fastener)
Fill with caulk
Drive in new fastener adjacent to the old one.

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Because it is a cement product all fasteners need to be hot dipped galvanized, to stop the fastener from being eaten by the lime in the cement.

Fasteners must be
corrosion resistant, galvanized or stainless steel.

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