In 2018 InterNACHI will be offering all of N. America free home inspections forever.

So would Nachi charge a % of inspection fee to cover cost?

Let me try it again in a different way. Here is how it works.

InterNACHI starts looking at homes for sale to inspect for free. We’ll start with certain homes first, homes that are likely going to generate numerous report downloads. Those might be homes that are being auctioned off, homes that are in foreclosure, very expensive homes, vacation homes, and homes that are likely to have many out-of-town buyers interested in them. We offer to inspect the homes for free. We pay InterNACHI members full-price to do those inspections. In return, the seller agrees to permit us to offer the inspection reports online as downloads that can be purchased. When a consumer reveals himself or herself to be a serious buyer by opening up his/her wallet and downloading a report, we ask that consumer if they are working with an agent, and if not, would they like our listing agent to help them with their real estate needs. If the consumer answers YES, we connect the consumer and agent for free. The participating listing agent will get hot real estate leads at no charge. Those leads are very valuable to any agent. The seller gets a free inspection plus the added benefit of his agent being able to work the very consumers who showed some real interest in his home. The inspector gets paid in full for an inspection that carries nearly zero liability as InterNACHI is the client and we aren’t ever going to sue our own member. In the terms-of-download, we explain to each consumer who downloads a report that they aren’t the inspector’s client and so have to get their own inspections. We further incentivize them by giving them a free “We’ll Buy Your Home Back” Guarantee if they do. And it might be possible to get the listing agent to agree to reimburse them the $39 if they enter into an agency relationship with the agent. The inspector also gets two more inspection job opportunities from the seller: Once for any repair-verification inspections he or the listing agent might want done and once again on the home the seller is moving to, should he be moving locally. If he isn’t moving locally, we’ll try to procure that inspection for yet another InterNACHI member. And presumably we can do the same for other sellers moving from out of town into the original inspector’s market. As you can see, the program would then begin to generate many additional inspection jobs for the industry which is good for all inspectors. Every time an inspector’s report is downloaded by someone who ultimately doesn’t buy the home, the inspector suffers no additional liability either as there is no liability in a report being in the hands of a consumer who doesn’t buy the home that was inspected. And in each of those cases, those consumers who didn’t buy the home are still looking for a home and will soon need a home inspector. So in effect, we dropped samples of the product the InterNACHI members produces as professionals, the reports, with their InterNACHI member’s contact information on those reports, smack into the hands of consumers who all are about to need home inspectors in the InterNACHI’s member’s local market. It’s target marketing beyond all belief! Furthermore, the listing agent who has now benefited greatly from this system and who received free hot real estate leads is likely going to want to do it again on other listings she has and presumably would consider contacting the original InterNACHI member to do it all over again.

Does that explain the program well?

I hope not. If that’s the case, the inspector performing an inspection when the email goes out is most definitely not going to get that inspection. I’ve responded to the OC emails within one minute and heard that someone else got the job. It’s happened several times actually. I hope it’s not a “chum the water” style of notification from NACHI. I love NACHI and the OC revenue, but if there were a better way to notify inspectors of jobs, that would be ideal.

Nick’s answer of “bingo” to this settled it for me. My knee-jerk reaction was negative, but after running the numbers and seeing the answers he has given, I’m in. Let’s start this thing.

I would ask that you all do me a small favor. I understand lots of rumors are floating around about how this program works. If you come across a FB page or forum where inspectors don’t understand the program, please post the following explanation for them:

“Here is how the program works: InterNACHI starts looking at homes for sale to inspect for free. We’ll start with certain homes first, homes that are likely going to generate numerous report downloads. Those might be homes that are being auctioned off, homes that are in foreclosure, very expensive homes, vacation homes, and homes that are likely to have many out-of-town buyers interested in them. We offer to inspect the homes for free. We pay InterNACHI members full-price to do those inspections. In return, the seller agrees to permit us to offer the inspection reports online as downloads that can be purchased. When a consumer reveals himself or herself to be a serious buyer by opening up his/her wallet and downloading a report, we ask that consumer if they are working with an agent, and if not, would they like our listing agent to help them with their real estate needs. If the consumer answers YES, we connect the consumer and agent for free. The participating listing agent will get hot real estate leads at no charge. Those leads are very valuable to any agent. The seller gets a free inspection plus the added benefit of his agent being able to work the very consumers who showed some real interest in his home. The inspector gets paid in full for an inspection that carries nearly zero liability as InterNACHI is the client and we aren’t ever going to sue our own member. In the terms-of-download, we explain to each consumer who downloads a report that they aren’t the inspector’s client and so have to get their own inspections. We further incentivize them by giving them a free “We’ll Buy Your Home Back” Guarantee if they do. And it might be possible to get the listing agent to agree to reimburse them the $39 if they enter into an agency relationship with the agent. The inspector also gets two more inspection job opportunities from the seller: Once for any repair-verification inspections he or the listing agent might want done and once again on the home the seller is moving to, should he be moving locally. If he isn’t moving locally, we’ll try to procure that inspection for yet another InterNACHI member. And presumably we can do the same for other sellers moving from out of town into the original inspector’s market. As you can see, the program would then begin to generate many additional inspection jobs for the industry which is good for all inspectors. Every time an inspector’s report is downloaded by someone who ultimately doesn’t buy the home, the inspector suffers no additional liability either as there is no liability in a report being in the hands of a consumer who doesn’t buy the home that was inspected. And in each of those cases, those consumers who didn’t buy the home are still looking for a home and will soon need a home inspector. So in effect, we dropped samples of the product the InterNACHI members produces as professionals, the reports, with their InterNACHI member’s contact information on those reports, smack into the hands of consumers who all are about to need home inspectors in the InterNACHI’s member’s local market. It’s target marketing beyond all belief! Furthermore, the listing agent who has now benefited greatly from this system and who received free hot real estate leads is likely going to want to do it again on other listings she has and presumably would consider contacting the original InterNACHI member to do it all over again.”

And the reason I’m meeting with Porch is because these homes are going to be inspected twice and issues are going to be discovered. It’s just a fact, no home is perfect. So either the seller is likely going to need to make a repair or two, or the buyer will likely have to make them. And so I am exploring ways to further incentivize adoption of this program by including something of value from Porch on the repair side. That’s the business they are in.

Makes sense?

That explains the concept. I get that.

But does not explain how individual inspectors can or can not market this program to their existing database.

You said InterNachi will seek out the homes, not members.

I have certain agents who convince their buyers to do a listing inspection every time. I have some agents who would never do a listing inspection, free or not.

Then I have certain agents who would like to do a listing inspection, but they don’t want to pay for the inspection themselves, and they can’t convince their sellers to pay for one, so they don’t get done. This would be where I see this potentially being a winner.

But you just said “We’ll start with certain homes first, homes that are likely going to generate numerous report downloads”

So

  1. Does that mean some homes will not qualify?

  2. If I have a listing agent who call me to inspect a home under this program do I have to get an approval first to make sure the home qualifies?

None of this affects your current business.

But if you and some listing agent you work with like the concept of the program, we’d love to try to work with you both. But again, you don’t have to of course.

If this means that a WDO inspection can be included in the free inspection, then it will very much disadvantage my home inspection company. Who would select me to pre-inspect when they can choose a competitor that can offer a termite inspection due to dual licensure or some type of (shady) arrangement with a termite company? I hope that I’m reading this wrong, but if not, please exclude termite inspections from the whole deal. Separate license here in Florida. :frowning:

Quote didn’t work…

FROM PAGE 7:

Re: In 2018 InterNACHI will be offering all of N. America free home inspections forev
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbitterman https://nachi.cachefly.net/forum/images/2006/buttons/viewpost.gif
Nick,
What about add-on inspections. In Florida WDO inspections are big. Would you cover the cost of adding that to the sellers inspection to show the home was clean or not? If termites were found then the seller could provide proof of treatment. This would also be helpful if the seller planned on the sale going VA.

**
Yes, covered **

            ***Florida Insurance Inspections***

Serving Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties since 2001.
Dennis J. Bonner, G.C
[size=3]CGC-1514215, HI-256[/size]

I think I can sell it fine.
However most times I do this for a “listing” they want to limit their repair expense & exposure AND most agents do not want to know much of anything anyways.

So I perform a 4 Point Major Systems (roof-electrical-plumbing-AC) & a WDO/Termite inspection.

My simple questions after reading the thousands of words here:
The agent puts me in touch with their seller/client.

  1. Will this type of work qualify for the program?
  2. Can I definitely perform the inspection or does it go into a system that I will loose it?

Probably. I haven’t worked out a formula for that yet.

I would never let you lose work that you procured.

And I think you make a good point about termite inspections. Also, it doesn’t make any sense for us to do those for free in addition to the home inspection as the real estate lead doesn’t increase any more in value, like our costs would increase for including a free WDO report.

Thank you for your quick reply Nick. Unnecessary costs, liability of course, complexity, and surely other issues. Glad to hear your perspective.

Looking forward to 2018. :slight_smile:

I have a few people in mind I could call immediately and have 2 or 3 inspections this week without any effort. Heck, one of them was just here in my house a few hours ago (our kids are best friends). I just need to the go ahead.

But Nick didn’t answer:

  1. Does that mean some homes will not qualify?

  2. If I have a listing agent who call me to inspect a home under this program do I have to get an approval first to make sure the home qualifies?

That was and still is your contention, (I assume) but it is not a reality. The whole idea is flawed from the start and riddled with so many potential bad outcomes it will cause too many negative situations to be of any value to any agents, sellers, inspectors etc… In my opinion.

Jim

Some already don’t. For example: I don’t see how a FSBO is going to be any use to us in this program. Homes under contract (pending) aren’t either. Anything before we launch the program next year, of course. I’m sure there are more.

Or just go do it and charge the seller directly like any other seller inspection. Either.

I don’t like that answer at all. I don’t see why this can’t be marketed just like the buyback program. Every home should qualify, except FSBO. If you want to make this program worthwhile to members and NACHI as an organization, shouldn’t you be targeting all RE represented homes for sale?

Having said that, I also don’t see why some members are losing their minds over this. It’s an attempt to launch a new revenue stream for everyone involved. It isn’t mandatory so if you dislike the idea, don’t participate!

Even if you don’t like it, and don’t activly participate in it, if your competition DOES, you are being affected! Like it or not, now you will have to deal with it.

Isn’t that the nature of business?

Tell us that when you make it past year one.
Btw… where’s your website?

The “you’re stupid because you haven’t done this for 20 years” argument is played out. If you can’t formulate an original thought, you should try to not comment. It makes you look weak and afraid.