IR training, camera advice

Ready to invest in IR training and camera. Would greatly appreciate any feedback about experiences with Infraspection, and Infrared-Certified. I think I’ve narrowed it down to one of them. Not sure if an internet class would be as useful as in-person training. I think buying the camera prior to the training, to get familiar with it, would be useful. Any advice?
Thanks a bunch.
Dale

Dale,

Do yourself a huge favor…do not participate in any IR internet training program. IR training requires 100% hands-on training. I’ve never participated in an Infraspection training program, so I can not say much about them. I can vouch for Flir training. They have very informative IR instructors which lead me into participate in two IR courses (Building Science and Level I Thermography) with this firm. They are the global leader in IR training.

Although I would agree on 95% of every piece of test and measurement equipment out there for the hands on training, I honestly feel as though IR is one that is at least as good to do distance learning, and maybe even better.

32 hours over a period of 4 days is a lot of material to absorb. With the distance learning program you have it for 60 full days to review as much as you like. Unlike normal test & measurement equipment, the end user can generally use an infrared camera within 15-30 mins of obtaining one. I am not saying they can use it “correctly”, but they could figure out how to take a picture in a very short amount of time. Try to use a Hi-Pot or XRF, even after a day of messing with it. The other thing I find backwards in infrared is, generally when I sell a piece of equipment the customer knows that science behind it. A power quality analyzer for example, the customer already knows electrical systems and is generally either a master electrician or engineer. So the science is already known by the customer. In infrared the science is the hard part and generally not understood by the customer.

Too each his own, some people just learn better in a hands on environment, and others absorb better via a distance learning program. For infrared I would say do whichever you are more comfortable with.

On a side note, Dale these two cameras come with level I training included.

Fluke Ti32
Fluke TiR32

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.google.com/profiles/115680326253714991585)
Testo 523
Testo 556](http://www.fluketir32.com/)
Testo 560](http://www.fluketir32.com/)

I agree with David, Hands On. I took my Level 1 with The Snell Group here in Richmond Hill , Ontario, Canada. They have a class room with built in defects for you to shoot during your training, and at least you have a qualified instuctor to help you utilize your camera and manipulate the environment to draw out the best possible images/results. You keep all the course material so that you can continue to review and study what you need but the hands on experience with the camera and an experienced instructor to help you learn to properly use it is a huge plus in my opinion.

Dear Dale:

Welcome to the exciting world of thermography!

As a professional educator that has been teaching thermography for over 20 years, I can appreciate the polarized opinions regarding hands-on training versus distance learning. Each approach has benefits and merits; however, distance learning does not require any travel which is often the greatest expense associated with classroom training.

During the past five years, Infraspection Institute has trained hundreds of thermographers from all over the world via our Distance Learning Program. We have received very positive feedback and have seen no compromise in anyone’s training. In fact, we find that students who elect to take our Certified Infrared Thermographer exam score as well as those who participate in our traditional classroom setting.

As Jason Kaylor points out in his email, 32 hours over a period of 4 days (Level I) is a lot of material to absorb. With Infraspection Institute’s Distance Learning courses, you have 60 days access to all course materials. You may log on 24/7 and learn at a pace that is convenient for you. You may also return to any course module as many times as you like in order to concentrate on specific areas of interest.

Because Infraspection Institute does not sell infrared equipment, our courses are presented without marketing hype. Course content is applicable to all brands of equipment regardless of make, model, or age. Additionally, several of our courses qualify for continuing education hours by NACHI and meet the training requirements for their Infrared Certified professional designation and logo.

Rather than rely on the opinions of those who have not taken advantage of the benefits of Distance Learning for thermography, I would invite you to speak with those who have taken our training. NACHI members who have participated in our training programs include Kevin Richardson, John Evans, and Greg Bell to name just a few. Each of these gentlemen have provided positive feedback on this messageboard in other threads.

For more information, I would invite you to to visit the Infraspection Institute website. Here you will find information on our Distance Learning and Open Enrollment classes.

As an alternative to registering with us directly, AC Tools packages our Distance Learning courses with several of their cameras.

Should you have any questions, please feel free to call us directly. We look forward to working with you!

Our IR webinar is not a distance learning course, it is always live.
Hundreds are out in the field because of our IR training, plus
they got the lowest price on an IR camera in the USA and a
free InterNACHI renewal. Best deal, best training, best camera
pirce bar none. I do not sell cameras but provide access to the
best offers available.

http://www.infrared-certified.com

Sounds like there is more to this than point and shoot?

Big time Paul.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/profiles_ep_86-1.html)
Fluke Ti32
Fluke TiR32
Blower Door](http://www.fluketir32.com/)
Duct Blaster](http://www.fluketir32.com/)

Which camera is more suitable for the residential home inspector? I do not want to over purchase and have features seldom required.

This is why sometimes it is better to get the training first. I would say at least 90% of the time, cameras end up doing other applications other than the original application that the customer bought it for.

The good news for you is, the manufactures are making it easier. It use to be you would spend 5k-15k and only get a camera that was designed for one application. So it would either have limited temp range or limited thermal sensitivity. The brand new cameras that have been released just over the past couple of months have super low thermal sensitivity and high temperature ranges in the same unit. The Ti32 is a great example of that.

Technically speaking the only way you can overbuy a camera (in todays market) is to change from a long wave to medium wave or short wave. All the cameras that you are shopping are long wave, which is where you will want to start. Medium and short wave imagers start in the $50k ballpark.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/profiles_ep_86-1.html)
Fluke Ti32
Fluke TiR32
Blower Door](http://www.fluketir32.com/)
Duct Blaster](http://www.fluketir32.com/)

Paul,

There is no need to over spend on an IR camera. Anything compact will do the trick. Flir offers the **(http://www.flir.com/thermography/americas/us/products/?id=17972) intended for building diagnostics and anything other than these particular IR cameras (being utilized for building diagnostics) is a waste of your money.

I chose the B-2 due its better resolution.**

As for the perfect camera for home inspectors, there is no question about it IMHO. See first post of http://www.nachi.org/forum/f58/why-fluke-tir-perfect-camera-international-association-certified-home-inspectors-members-42955/

As for training particular to IR, I’ll give it to you in order of best to worst. Best being #1.

#1 Online video. Best by far. Way too many advantages. Go at your own pace. See dozens of different actual situations. All the garbage edited out. Able to repeat. Able to see the screen up close. There is nothing like voice over video for learning. Professor has a chance to give you his best. Often includes multiple experts. Able to pause and re-start. Able to take it when YOU want to learn for the length of time you want to learn. Inexpensive cost. You get exclusive use of your own bathroom.

#2 On site. Pretty good. Provided you get to a home or building with several situations like online video is capable of providing. You can’t repeat, take it when you want, or see as many situations as online video, but it is still pretty good because it is real.

#3 Classroom. Pretty bad. Not much you can learn from sitting in a chair and watching a power point presentation. No reason to be there live unless the curriculum is so weak that you need to personally ask questions to fill in gaps. Have to take it when it is offered. Have to listen to the nut in the front row pretend to ask a question and end up telling a 45 minute story. Have to go at classroom pace, not yours. Camaraderie though.

#4 Distance learning. Horrible. They just send you the books and tell you to read them. Kind of like a classroom only worse.

I don’t know much about webinars and so didn’t include them. And I of course like online non-video courses but not for IR training.

Nick, where does one get a video?

#1 Online video. Best by far. Way too many advantages. Go at your own pace. See dozens of different actual situations. All the garbage edited out. Able to repeat. Able to see the screen up close. There is nothing like voice over video for learning. Professor has a chance to give you his best. Often includes multiple experts. Able to pause and re-start. Able to take it when YOU want to learn for the length of time you want to learn. Inexpensive cost. You get exclusive use of your own bathroom.

Nick do you have any recommendations for a video for Energy Audit Training?

Free IR video here… nach.tv has more that cost a few bucks.

http://nachi.tv/episode33

We have hundreds of inspectors who have told us that our
LIVE webinar class answered all their questions and was
very dynamic in it’s presentation. Nothing like a dull recorded
class.

http://www.infrared-certified.com

Contact me for a discount.

I agree with you. IR training AND cameras are in their infancy and thats a gross understatement. You’ll learn quickly that everyone and their little sister is trying to make money off of your camera, and a monopoly will be very valuable to those that create it. You’ll learn far more at home playing with your camera than you’ll ever learn in existing classes.

Though I do believe that as far as training courses go, John McKenna’s course is the best out there (for HI’s). If for any other reason, he gets the difference between qualitative and quantitative analysis, and the NACHI prerequisites are spot-on with building science, green building, etc.

I do however have a burning desire to see John re-do his video with a correct pronunciation of “Realtor”… I prefer not to be viewed as a hillbilly, and I refuse to do business with Real-i-tors :wink:

Nick, are any of these courses actually taught by professors?

:mrgreen:

Please…

C’mon David…there’s entertainment value in asking a question where you already know the answer :wink: