Is it Really a Bathroom?

Shower stall and sink. No toilet.

Why do you ask?

Just to elicit discussion. :wink:

The two fixtures shown drained into an an open sump basket with submersible pump and no alarm.

“Gray water” only… allowed in many areas.

Thank god there is no toilet. :slight_smile:

Not around here or where you are at.

You need to get out to the farm homes more often. Usually see similar with the basement showers the farmers had to use before Mrs. Farmer would allow their arses in the house!

Note: these homes are typically on Septic systems also.

Oh I know.

This is not my first rodeo.

This was on septic.

I know you know.

It was more for the education/information of others/newer inspectors.

Once you get out of incorporated areas, almost anything goes. There are many areas I inspect that have no AHJ’s to inspect, anyway.

You sure?

http://www.gdargaud.net/Photo/Rodeo/RodeoGetOff.jpg

;):twisted::mrgreen:

http://www.nachi.org/forum/attachments/f22/66000d1370806299t-really-bathroom-100_4980.jpg
They could at least put a lid on it.

Some Info for people on Grey water
http://greywater-systems.com/regs.htm

Nice link Wayne, thanks.

Graywater is wastewater that has been used in clothes washers, showers, bathtubs, and lavatory sinks. In some parts of the country graywater may be collected using separate drainage pipes, then filtered and temporarily stored (without treatment) before being distributed in subsurface outdoor irrigation. There are also systems that direct lavatory washwater to an adjacent toilet tank to be used (after limited treatment with disinfectant) for toilet flushing. Blackwater describes wastewater from toilets, urinals, kitchen sinks, and dishwashers, which may contain food and human waste and is not as easily reused.

http://www.buildinggreen.com/auth/article.cfm/2009/2/26/Graywater-Collection-and-Use/:)

Yes, and said Graywater, (with it’s soaps and chemicals), when directed to the (Blackwater) Septic system, may cause irreparable harm to the drainfield, oftentimes ‘killing’ it, thus the practice of utilizing a separate drainfield/dry well.

Something like that. :slight_smile:

Not for a properly sized and maintained system.

In NH, typical dry wells have not been used in years. The only dry well allowed now is for the backwash of water treatment systems.

That has been debated for decades, thus the huge market for…
http://activerain.com/image_store/uploads/9/5/9/0/8/ar136004055080959.jpg

And a total waste of money no matter what Russel Ray says. :wink:

Any functioning system has more than enough bacteria to do its job.

Snake oil comes in many flavors :wink: