Modified floor truss system?

Just inspected a beachfront townhouse and the whole crawl space was done like this. They have ripped plywood and attached it to either side of the floor truss system all the way across. The little bit I could see looked like the metal brackets that hold the trusses together had corroded. Also for what ever reason they add support posts down the middle span of these but they’re not even touching the trusses? Anyone ever seen anything like this. This crawl space was definitely flooded during super storm sandy.

Drew, I would make sure that they present an engineers fix stamped paperwork as part of your report.

Also, it may be wise to refer for further investigation of the wall systems for moisture damage and undermining damage (think filled back in but not compacted.) of the foundation system.

Was there new paint?

JMHO

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Walls were concrete block original to the home, theres sand in the crawl space and outside. Honestly I didnt see anything going on with the walls, the place was a middle unit with a bulkhead in the back that looks like it was recently rebuilt probably after sandy. Doesn’t hurt to have them looked at though. I will be going with what you said about the trusses, an engineer would of had to approve this originally if not then they will need one to give it the stamp of approval or not. Thanks again Larry

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New paint? Where at larry

I was thinking walls but disregard because they were block. :smile:

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They do need some paint down there but in the way of mold remediation paint :+1:

Also.

https://www.nema.org/Standards/Pages/Evaluating-Water-Damaged-Electrical-Equipment.aspx

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What does this off topic response have to do with the OP’s post?

The OP’s post did mention that it was the crawlspace that got flooded. I, missed that point, and also assumed that it flooded up throughout the house. Hence my comment about referring for further investigation of the walls systems.

I don’t know if there was much, if any electrical, down in the crawlspace but Michael may have assumed that point, also, Marcel. Even though I don’t care for his demeanor, I think his suggestion is valid.

JMHO

There is no electrical issues in the OP’s question post. And we don’t need Mike to tell us what is wrong and start another horse beaten trail on to something else.
We all know what flooding does to a structure.
Electrical has to be removed in it’s entirety after flooding anyways. (correction to have meant in the space of flooding.

If your basement flooded up to 36", would you replace all of the electrical in the entire house.

Like I said, I don’t care for Michael’s demeanor but he has a point that Drew may not have thought of.

JMHO

OP first picture 'appears to have NM in the crawl.

Hmmm

See, that’s what I mean about your demeanor. You seem to enjoy rubbing people’s noses in it, Michael.

We’re here to learn and share our experiences in a friendly way.

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Thanks Michael, all the wiring in the crawl space looked new and there wasn’t very much.

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I edited my post to point out that I meant the space that flooded. Drew said that looked new, so that takes care of that but it don’t take care of what is hiding behind those joist covers ups.

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The brackets that I could see were pretty heavily corroded. Plus organic growth on the bottom of the visible trusses. So probably quite a bit lol.

My guess is that, yes they did have an issue with the gangnails rusting (which can happen especially in coastal areas) and maybe the trusses were under engineered for the span. Looks like they tried to fix them by turning them into old fashioned box beams and adding a center support. Box beams can be strong provided they are nailed correctly. Probably only an engineer could tell you if this repair method is acceptable here.

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I agree with you, Ray. This doesn’t look like it is nailed nearly enough, ( I’d think adhesive, too.) IMHO:

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/internachi/original/3X/6/c/6c8b0ee96e35cbc713e7eacb289afaa092de5c21.jpeg

It don’t amount to much recommending an engineer, once he gets there, he will require that plywood be removed so the web truss plates and connections be examined.
So you might as well recommend a qualified licensed contractor with engineers in house to evaluate the condition and repair accordingly.
This could end up being an expensive enterprise.

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You’re right…I noticed the lack of nails too…

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