New Type of Receptacle Introduced

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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New Type of Receptacle Introduced! Thoughts?


![](upload://mkBUQggT2qxYZiMZyXB2ngAcfed.jpeg)



--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: cbuell
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totally cool----wouldn’t work for split type recep though


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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jtedesco wrote:
New Type of Receptacle Introduced! Thoughts?


Yes. One more set of contacts to burn out.

Just what is needed, a receptacle which plugs in from both the front and the rear. Now we gotta watch for smoke and burn marks from the rear too?


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Here is the rest of the story!


http://www.passandseymour.com/whatsnew/plugtail.html

![icon_rolleyes.gif](upload://iqxt7ABYC2TEBomNkCmZARIrQr6.gif)


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: dbozek
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Actually…kind of cool. It would do away with the nightmares involved with wiring a outlet…or several outlets for the same circuit. How many times have you seen outlets used as splices, or the typical outlet that is stabbed in the back with the wire instead of wrapping it around the screw. I’ve seen more short circuit from stabbed outlets than from any other type of termination. Furthermore, with no side terminals, the chance of an outlet touching a metal box, or the madison strap holding in a old work box…is now…no longer…a problem.


Originally Posted By: dbozek
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After looking at the link Joe sent…I’m gonna start using them icon_lol.gif


If properly installed why would there be any smoke coming from the rear. Can't ya see the benefits in this device? Installation time is cut in half....no more taping them duplexes to jeep them from shorting out against a metal box.....and the best one......if ya gotta replace the thing.....the wires are long enough to do such easily.......no more wires so short that you even wonder how anyone installed the device in the first place!!!


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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Now I’m confused.


The link states "Wiring devices have always been installed one wire at a time. But now, PlugTail offers a faster, more cost-effective way. With PlugTail, all connections are made simultaneously ? by simply plugging a PlugTail connector into the back of a PlugTail wiring device."

Then shows the PlugTail being wired one wire at a time.

I don't see much time savings. I see the time being transfered from trim out to rough-in, with maybe a marginal time savings simply because you are not holding the receptacle in your hand. But if you are comparing it to backstabbing the receptacle, you have not saved any time, but spent more time (wire nutting the PlugTail versus backstabbing the receptacle).

Of course, what are your going to do when you are trying to stuff all those PlugTails back into crowded outlet boxes so they are not hanging out there from rough-in to trim out and they just don't want to fit into the outlet box? Install larger (deeper) outlet boxes?


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: dbozek
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Well Jerry…I kind of do this stuff often…and if you are just tying several outlets on a branch circuit, chances are there will be a piece of NM entering and a piece of NM leaving a box. Thus, there is not a large amount of conductors being tied in boxes. I never stab devices for doing such in my mind creates more of a hazard for that device to short circuit in time. I always wrap my conductors around the side terminals and then, if it is a metal box, I tape the outlet to prevent it from possibly touching the box, (which if grounded correctly will create a nice light show). Using these new devices would significantly reduce the risk of short circuits and it makes the replacement of devices far easier. Typically, I rarely shut power off to replace any device, but then I know how to do such without shorting anything out or shocking myself. However, with this device, it is a no brainer. Simply remove the outlet, pull off the connector, and replace the device. Your done! I am sure that Pass and Seymour put a lot of thought and engineering into this device before putting them out there for sale. I would be somewhat certain that the connector would be locked into place so that it cannot be easily removed as well. Granted, you still would have to tie the pigtail to the existing wires, but one thing you do not have to do is wrap the wires around the screw terminals, nor do you have to strip the wire just right to stab it in the back of the device. Overall…it is quicker and easier and actually far safer. In the case of having several wires in a box though, if one cannot insert a outlet because of the amount of wires in a box, there is a good chance there are too many wires in the box in the first place.


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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If the prongs on the back of the receptacle are cooked, like happens to plugs all the time, then the plug will also be cooked and will need replacing. No time savings.


You referred to your never using backstabbing, congratulations. However, many, many electricians do. With screw terminals, I can see some time saving building, but with backstabbing? Not much, if any.

I guess we shall see if this is one of those new products offered each year that does not make it.

If you could 30 seconds at each receptacle (going with your screw terminals, not form backstabbing), but each of these new receptacles cost 50 cents more .... would it be worth it? How about $1 more? Wonder what the cost comparison is going to be?

I always used to use the screw terminals too, I've seen far too many poor connections in back stabbed receptacles. Which makes me suspicious of the new plug in this receptacle. It is just adding another failure point to the receptacle.

I just see too much wrong with new construction to jump at the next 'new thing'. Today, I was at a pre-insulation pre-drywall framing inspection, when my client (he is a supt. for another builder) called tonight to see what I thought, I told him "If it wasn't so hot, I would have been laughing most of the afternoon. When you get the report and the photos, you'll be crying. They even put a precast window sill in backwards, to help guide the water to the inside."

Like this.


[ Image: precast sill in backwards ]


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Looks like a good idea to me. I like the fact that you no longer have to disconnect additional feeds to replace one receptacle. It would save time and energy in pass through applications since all the wires could be easily pigtailed making downstream devices easier to feed. It certainly looks easier to install the receptacle since you are pushing stranded wire into the box versus the stiffer solid wire, which do tend to lead to short circuits.


I for one would be interested in installing and using a few before I would buy into it but clearly it has several advantages.

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: Ryan Jackson
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jmyers wrote:
It would save time and energy ....


How would it save energy?


--
Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City

Originally Posted By: Guest
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The installer’s energy.


To me, it’s just one more connection to fail.


Originally Posted By: Randy Flockton
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Here’s something really odd! I haven’t come across these personally yet… But the concept seems great!


Protect-Connect Devices


--
"Prices subject to change with customers additude"

Originally Posted By: dbozek
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How many HI’s write up a receptacle for reverse polarity? With these devices that problem is also gone. Personally I kinda like these widgets for I can see the time savings and ease with them. If I had a nickel for every outlet I had installed or replaced I surely would be living in a bigger house on a larger hill.


I'm gonna try them and I'll let you know. Like any new product there is going to be some skepticism. I remember when those new push in type wirenuts came out. I thought they were great as well but after using them for a bit, I quickly changed my view on them. The cost of them puppies was outrageous and yea they saved some time and the ole wrist, but frankly, they were far too difficult to remove and if the wire was not properly stripped, they were just as impractical as backstabbing an outlet. I do carry some for at times they can help, especially if the wires in a box are really short, but overall, I do not use them. My carpal tunnel can remain for I prefer the ole wingnut wirenut.


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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dbozek wrote:
How many HI's write up a receptacle for reverse polarity? With these devices that problem is also gone.


Dennis,

Please explain why this device would eliminate that problem.

Screw-ups are screw-ups, and there is no way (within my scope of thought) that these devices will eliminate screw-ups.

When the PlugTail is wired backwards, you will still get reverse polarity.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: dbozek
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Well the leads are color coded…black white and green. Receptacles are often wired in the reverse because Mr. Homeowner doesn’t know that black goes to the gold screw and white to the silver. Pretty much a no brainer here…white goes to white…green goes to green and black goes to black. The connector only goes on one way! Certainly appears to me that the reverse polarity problem would be greatly decreased if not at all.


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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I dunno, maybe, but I can sure imagine the incidences of false or bootleg grounds will also go up (using that same reasoning).


No ground for the green to be wired too? Shoot, just wire that sucker to the white, there, that's all taken care of. What's next, boss?


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: bhendry
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There are engineering specialties just for automotive connectors. The auto manufacturers spend a LOT of money on ‘cipherin’ connectors. The marine (boat) industry is keenly interested in good connectors - they don’t have the resources of the car guys though. I suspect these outlet systems can be related to a car to some extent.


A gozinta and a gotouta connector is really well understood these days.

If I had to bet/guess - the connections of interest are EXTREMELY within tolerance and well designed. It would be interesting to have the guy that designed them say a few words here.

My hope is that the back stabbin' electricians like these devices.

Regards,

Bill

![](upload://6W2YnX4wTESErcMziSzPMju9jcW.gif)


Originally Posted By: dbozek
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Actually I am not a back stabbin electrician and I do like these widgets. But I do have to thank you HI’s for if it wasn’t for the few here in Ohio, I probably would not get as much work as I do. I went to a house today to correct violations that were noted during a home inspection. The guy said that the grounds were double lugged on the neutral buss. I said to the homeowner…hmm really lol. The other violation was a gfci which was not working in the garage. Oddly enough it worked just fine when I truned the switch on for it. The last violation was a missing cover for a box in the crawl space. I crawled in there to check it out and inside were phone connections. I got a rather good laugh at all of this and then I asked the home owner if he made mention of the aluminum greenfield wire tied to the copper piping. She said…umm I don’t think so…is that a problem? icon_lol.gif I then asked her if he made mention of 30 feet of greenfield running across the basement ceiling which was strapped like every 10 feet and again she said ummm no I don’t think so. icon_lol.gif Finally after fixing all that was missed and all that was not needed to be fixed, I told the customer that in the future…if she wanted a “professional” electrical inspection, she should contact a electrical contractor versus a HI. Oddly enough she agreed.


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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I like the twisters but after a while of twisting those babies on, my fingers are sore enough that I never want to see another one as long as I live. icon_biggrin.gif


Joe Myers