Shibboleths

More lingustic passwords
http://realtytimes.com/rtcpages/20041201_shibboleths.htm

I think the same applies to usage and spelling on this board. When potential clients read our posts (assuming, of course, that they do) they are sub-consciously forming an opinion based on our grammar and spelling. It also comes through in phone conversations when they call to book an inspection. Or in our brochures or other advertisements. And in our reports – it affects future referrals, possilbly.

Accents can play a role as well. I recently received a call from an investor in New York looking to book an inspection. We completely annoyed the dickens out of each other with his “What do yous guys charge?” in his Bronx dialect and my “Well, it depends on what type of home y’all are looking for” in my best Texas drawl. I didn’t get the job.

Bill Ball is an ***. What he refers to as a “Professional Home Inspector”, most of us refer to as a Realtor® [FONT=‘Times New Roman’]Suck [FONT=Verdana]Up…[/FONT][/FONT]

Maybe he should add this one to his list

adequate

One entry found for adequate. Main Entry: ad·e·quate [http://www.m-w.com/images/audio.gif](javascript:popWin(’/cgi-bin/audio.pl?adequa02.wav=adequate’))
Pronunciation: -kw&t
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin adaequatus, past participle of adaequare to make equal, from ad- + aequare to equal – more at EQUABLE
1 : sufficient for a specific requirement <adequate taxation of goods>; also : barely sufficient or satisfactory <her first performance was merely adequate>
2 : lawfully and reasonably sufficient <adequate grounds for a lawsuit>
synonym see SUFFICIENT

  • ad·e·quate·ly adverb
  • ad·e·quate·ness noun

Which if you take Erby’s impression it kind of fits

Paul

This is exactly the kind of tripe that should not be held up as the holy grail of home inspection. If ‘Bill’ thinks that his clients are going to be offended by what he judges to be poor use of the language then that is his business. My clients are more concerned with the content and accuracy of my reports and are little concerned with my penchant for compound sentences.

Fitting too, is his quotation of his own book; not the slightest self serving of course.

" Bill, why don’t you just . . . . :shock: !"*

  • excerpted from George’s book of “Handy epithets for the practicing professional Home Inspector”
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Copied from the site in massage #1

"“Defect” is a word used by a home inspector only at the peril of being identified as an outsider to the transaction. I can’t tell you the number of times that I have had agents tell me that they “hate home inspectors.” The reason agents hate them is because the inspector is too often oblivious to the emotions created by the words they elect to use in their reports.

What a bunch of drivial. Any inspector’s report that does not use these words is not serving their client. It is because the salesman “realtor” misuses the language to obscure and confuse that we have an inspection industry. Instead of getting upset with this nonsence maybe we should thank him for his assistance in creating a need for inspectors.
Thanks Bill.

“Professional Home Inspectors substitute the word “condition” for all of these words, and then describe the condition in clear, concise language that does not include directives.
“Defect” is a word used by a home inspector only a the peril of being identified as an outsider to the transaction. I can’t tell you the number of times that I have had agents tell me that they “hate home inspectors.” The reason agents hate them is because the inspector is too often oblivious to the emotions created by the words they elect to use in their reports.”

The ones that hate us are the ones that can not stand the truth. Any honest person welcomes plain clear English.

"Other shibboleths used by inspectors are:

  • Problem
  • Unsatisfactory
  • Not functional
  • Requiring repair
    Professional Home Inspectors substitute the word “condition” for all of these words, and then describe the condition in clear, concise language that does not include directives. "

Live with it baby. I’ve used these words for over thirty years in the inspection business. Defect and deficiency are good words and if some mealy mouthed realtor does not like it, to bad.
In my previous career these terms were written into the contracts and specifications by real professionals, engineers, architects and lawyers.

Have a nice day.

Concern.
Of interest.
Of note.
Amiss.
Untoward.

I have banished the word “problem” from my vocabulary.

Another interesting commentary on defining “defects”
http://www.mpgroup.com/art8.pdf
http://www.resource4constructiondefects.com/topics/whatareconstructiondefects.html

Occassionally I use

Crap
finnished
dozer bait
unsafe
why am I here? :slight_smile:

1.2. A Material defect is a condition with a residential real property or any portion of it that would have a significant adverse impact on the value of the real property or that involves an unreasonable risk to people on the property. The fact that a structural element, system or subsystem is near, at or beyond the end of the normal useful life of such a structural element, system or subsystem is not by itself a material defect.

As home inspectors - do you see the potential for risk? Are “we” arbitrarily assuming extra risk by minimizing the impact of an aged water heater as example - due for replacement on behalf of the client?

1.3. An Inspection report shall describe and identify in written format the inspected systems, structures, and components of the dwelling and shall identify material defects observed. Inspection reports may contain recommendations regarding conditions reported or recommendations for correction, monitoring or further evaluation by professionals, but this is not required.

Unlike some other SOP, I suggest that dealing with issues “head on” helps the client realize the value of not just identifying a defect, but to put into perspective the impact of the condition on the client. I believe the word “may” affords an option - the inspector can or “may” possibly assume risk at the inspectors peril.

Again just a few thoughts on this issue.

I don’t provide my clients with the SOP. Sorry the SOP look like one big disclaimer. At that point one would ask of the inspector; What are you inspecting?

I think many seem to trivialize the small stuff when inspecting, when in fact its the big stuff we need to draw our clients attention to. In that regard you had better to be sure to know your client and feel him out so to speak what he expects. I always ask my clients about their wants and needs, what they may do to the house, what they do, where they live now. Building repore with your cleint is essential in my opinion.

Maybe Mr.Ball would prefer that Realtors (sometimes pronounced ‘Real-tators)’ have absolute power to ‘hood-wink’ potential clients and we Professional Home Inspectors, just spoil all his plans.
Maybe Mr.Ball should try buying a house of Ill-repair, without a PHI and then later ask the question to his contractor, “Defect? what Defect?”
Maybe Mr.Ball should change his name to Mr.Bull!

(My apologies to other Mr. or Miss Balls out there)