The Home Inspector Pledge

Nathan, I see your website is still sitting out there, as you continue to condemn others for basically the same thing.

I also still see no links on your site to verify any of the numerous inspectors who you claim to have taken your pledge, which months ago, you had repeatedly said you were going to provide. http://homeinspectorpledge.com/

You should either s h i t or get off the pot.

As you can see the website that you constantly condemn DOES have a list of trustworthy inspectors who have proudly taken the pledge not to release their information to TPSPs (Third Party Service Providers) for the purpose of consideration. http://trustyourinspector.org/Trustworthy_Inspectors_.html

Happy New Year!! :smiley:

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Thanks for the reply Nathan.

I expected nothing more.

Happy New Year.

Members of these home inspector pledge groups, that engage in deceiving the public by having them believe there is an inordinate amount of home inspectors that secretly sell their private information are crooks and scam artists. All home inspectors in this organization, are bound by the code of ethics to not release inspection reports, report findings, or client data, to third parties, without written permission from the client. Nearly all other inspectors from similar organizations, are bound by the same code, or even their state laws. Any inspector embellishing the dangers, and hyperbolizing the existence of home inspectors who do sell private information, are frauds. Their livelihood is dependent on consumers falling prey to this illusion of danger, and overlooking more important factors to consider when choosing a home inspector.

A bunch of crap stirrers .

So, where EXACTLY do you gain written permission from YOUR clients, and EXACTLY what verbiage is used to gain it? Post a copy here (in it’s entirety) for all to see. This should not be an issue for you if all is “above board”. As you have posted in the public section of the MB, the public should be allowed to judge for themselves.

And yet here you are, poking it with a stick! :stuck_out_tongue:

Who else would like to be on the snollygosterbots list?

So far we have:

Juan
Troy
Roy
Camroon
George

One of the more dishonest lead brokers requires home inspectors to add language to their contracts that informs their client that their private information might be provided to an unidentified “third party service provider”. They refer to this as “disclosure” and consider their signed contracts as “written permission”.

Later, in the same contract, the same dishonest lead broker requires that the home inspector must keep all contractual arrangements “confidential” and is forbidden from informing his client, the home buyer, of his contractual arrangement with the lead broker (or even the very existence of his contractual relationship with the lead broker) without the lead broker’s written consent. (See article 9, “Confidentiality”.)

Perhaps this is the “written permission” that this inspector is referring to.

Home buyers considering hiring a home inspector are wise to take the time to discuss with their home inspector what he does with the information about his client and his client’s new home.

One of the more dishonest lead brokers requires home inspectors to add language to their contracts that informs their client that their private information might be provided to an unidentified “third party service provider”. They refer to this as “disclosure” and consider their signed contracts as “written permission”.

Later, in the same contract, the same dishonest lead broker requires that the home inspector must keep all contractual arrangements “confidential” and is forbidden from informing his client, the home buyer, of his contractual arrangement with the lead broker (or even the very existence of his contractual relationship with the lead broker) without the lead broker’s written consent. (See article 9, “Confidentiality”.) The inspector, accordingly, cannot inform the home buyer of the “compensation” that the contract provides the inspector in exchange for the personal data.

In fact, he may be in violation of his contract with the lead broker if he were to discuss these terms with you or to post them on the message board … as I have.

Perhaps this is the “written permission” that this inspector is referring to.

Home buyers considering hiring a home inspector are wise to take the time to discuss with their home inspector what he does with the information about his client and his client’s new home.

So basically, this “disclosure” (as opposed to written permission) is buried deep in the inspectors “Contract” or “Inspection Agreement” and could be overlooked by the unassuming public? I know of some inspectors that utilize contracts that are up to 5 pages long!

Correct … but the so-called “disclosure” does not identify the party receiving the home buyer’s private information. Accordingly, the information can be sold to anyone … or any combination of service providers … for an indefinite period of time without even the home inspector being aware of it.

This is why home buyers who are agreeing to allow home inspectors to sell their private data to others should, at a minimum, be demanding specific information about the third party who is receiving their information so that they can address any future issues that might arise from it.

I see the new guys got the old timers running scared still. They want to see the new guys contracts. How about you post yours first? You sure do “demand” stuff you have no business knowing. Want to see his contract? Pay $400 for his inspection and I am sure he will send it over.

I bet most here have the “I am only liable for the fee paid” hidden in their contract.

Juan how can a guy in this business for as short of a period of time be causing this much fear in “senior” inspectors. Speaks volumes, keep up the good work! These old timers just hate having to step up their game to keep up with you…

What I think many consumers would find distrubing is that they could easily sign away their privacy rights or worse, be assured, if they notice the clause, that its really nothing to be concerned with.

Now I find this to be more than a little unethical and am dismayed that some home inspectors have been convinced that this is just another way to increase their income and provide another service to their customers.

It may be a clever way for the alarm/warranty salesmen to increase his income but at the price of the home inspectors position of trust.

There are many, many dishonest ways of increasing income. This is only one of them … but, fortunately, informed consumers can avoid being exploited.

16 inspectors? Your bragging that 16 inspectors have took your pledge? How many recallchek users are there? Didnt he say over 2500 at one time?

Or maybe the “seniors” just get tired of the hype and mistresentation made by a few vocal shills against the trust your inspector pledge.

Not that I expect you to get it as you are taking you morning dump in your inspection vehicle.:roll::roll:

Who knows? He’s been caught in so many lies its difficult to say.

Have you look for how many there are in your area?

Do so and let us know.

Extrapolate from there.

According to the Indiana Attorney General’s office in a letter sent to me on 10/22/13, the contract provision that we are discussing was reviewed by them and “appears to be legally invalid” and “should an alarm company rely on that provision and call a consumer whose number is listed on Indiana’s Do Not Call list, that alarm company may be committing a deceptive act in violation of Indiana law.(IC 24-4.7-4-1).”

Accordingly, home buyers who are on No Call Lists and wind up being contacted as a result of a home inspector selling their private information should still contact their Attorney General and report the infraction. Hopefully, they would have demanded and received the full name and contact information from the home inspector before agreeing to sign the contract so that the attorney general can take action.

Point is im sure way more than 16 have taken the other pledge.