Toe nails or clips

Here is one more. Suggestive opinions only (here to learn and improve)

Thank you,

Md Uddin (Nasir)
Local Home Inspection LLC
863-513-9426, 407-513-2317
infolocalinspection@gmail.com

Minimal conditions to qualify for categories B, C, or D. All visible metal connectors are:
􀀀 Secured to truss/rafter with a minimum of three (3) nails, and
􀀀 Attached to the wall top plate of the wall framing, or embedded in the bond beam, with less than a ½" gap from the blocking or truss/rafter and blocked no more than 1.5” of the truss/rafter, and free of visible severe corrosion.

􀀀 B. Clips
􀀀 Metal connectors that do not wrap over the top of the truss/rafter, or
􀀀 Metal connectors with a minimum of 1 strap that wraps over the top of the truss/rafter and does not meet the nail position requirements of C or D, but is secured with a minimum of 3 nails.

Then that picture above would not meet that criteria;
The strap was embedded to deep in the bond beam and one nail hole is not being used.


evandeven

      [Eric Van De Ven, CMI](https://forum.nachi.org/u/evandeven)

      InterNACHI®️ CPI




    October 19

Minimal conditions to qualify for categories B, C, or D. All visible metal connectors are:
􀀀 Secured to truss/rafter with a minimum of three (3) nails, and

􀀀 Attached to the wall top plate of the wall framing, or embedded in the bond beam, with less than a ½" gap from the blocking or truss/rafter and blocked no more than 1.5” of the truss/rafter, and free of visible severe corrosion.

􀀀 B. Clips
􀀀 Metal connectors that do not wrap over the top of the truss/rafter, or
􀀀 Metal connectors with a minimum of 1 strap that wraps over the top of the truss/rafter and does not meet the nail position requirements of C or D, but is secured with a minimum of 3 nails.


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mcyr

      [Marcel R. Cyr, CMI](https://forum.nachi.org/u/mcyr)

      Certified Master Inspector




    October 19

evandeven:
Secured to truss/rafter with a minimum of three (3) nails

Then that picture above would not meet that criteria;

The strap was embedded to deep in the bond beam and one nail hole is not being used.


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In Reply To


evandeven

      [Eric Van De Ven, CMI](https://forum.nachi.org/u/evandeven)

      InterNACHI®️ CPI




    October 19

Minimal conditions to qualify for categories B, C, or D. All visible metal connectors are: 􀀀 Secured to truss/rafter with a minimum of three (3) nails, and 􀀀 Attached to the wall top plate of the wall framing, or embedded in the bond beam, with less than a ½" gap from the blocking or truss/rafter …


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Md; to help make it easy for you:
On the OIR form; Check the box on line 4 “Toe nails”. Then below that; check the box that states "Metal connectors that do not meet the minimal conditions of B, C, or D.
Then go down and check the box “Line F: Other” and type in “Metal straps that do not wrap over, attached to the side of the truss / rafter with 2 nails”

Thank you Mike so much. I owe you a big time.

Happy to help

It may be…but…you then have to prove it. Good luck trying to do that.
I spent a significant amount of time with one of the head guys at Simpson Strongtie, and even sent him around 30 pictures of various roof to wall connections for a presentation he was giving.

The problem with the form is that it sometimes conflicts with the building code (deck re-nailing for instance), and the manufacturer.
On a cantilevered patio overhang, the trusses are connected to the support wall, in most instances, with 2 straps that come out of the bond beam on either side, with 5-9 nails in each strap.

According to the form, that is a clip. According to the manufacturer and depending on how many nails are used, it can be up to a double wrap rating.
The same issue was discovered with the “Sanibel” strap.

The good news, is that depending on your insurance carrier, as long as you have a “clip”, it doesn’t really matter if you have a single wrap, double wrap, etc… See attached photo

from our policy.

Or, just check toe nails.
It is why I posted what the definition is on the form. There are few scenarios where you will get a credit with less than 3 nails “visible”.
Make it easy on those poor insurance people who have little to no training on how to fill out the 1802 form…much less what it means. :wink::wink:

It’s a toe nail …Yep!
Please move on…

1 Like

Thank you Mr. Eric. I marked it as Toe nail. It will help me in the future as well.

Md Uddin

I think we may be talking about 2 different things.
You may be talking about construction methods and their terms.

I believe, the OP was talking about what to put on a wind mitigation inspection report.
The definitions I posted are directly from the 1802 form.

I have in some instances, been able to get the drawings, etc…, submit them to the insurance company, but they have no idea what any of it means.
The roof to wall connection pictured in the OP, is a toe nail, or, no discount given, on the 1802 form.
Any single wrap that was installed improperly, also will not get the credit and will be classified as toe nail on that form as well. In that case, in the other line on the form, I would list the defects which would cause me to check the toe nail box, for an improperly installed single wrap. Which could be something like, strap only had two nails, even though it went over the truss.

To the original poster, INACHI has a wind mitigation course available for free.