Tool organization systems?

Originally Posted By: Russell Frame
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How do you organize your tools?


I'm trying to build my system. My thought is to use an electrican's belt for hauling around the must-have tools like flashlight, mirror, outlet tester/multimeter, screwdrivers, marking tape, etc. Then keeping less used and bulky items in a tool bag.

Is there a better method or system available?


Originally Posted By: Scott Patterson
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Russell Frame wrote:
How do you organize your tools?

I'm trying to build my system. My thought is to use an electrican's belt for hauling around the must-have tools like flashlight, mirror, outlet tester/multimeter, screwdrivers, marking tape, etc. Then keeping less used and bulky items in a tool bag.

Is there a better method or system available?


I use a large tool bag to old the majority of my tools that I will use in the house. I then have a "Fanny Pack" that I keep my screwdrivers, moisture meter, Elec. testers, etc. in while I roam the house. I like the fanny pack because it has a zipper and I can wear it on my waist, sling it over my shoulder or I have even attached it to my ankle as I wiggled under a tight crawl space.

I try to bring as few tools as needed, you will find that the longer you are in the business you will use less and less gadgets and tools.


Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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I have a tool bag with shoulder strap. Only downside is when you get busy and wandering, you have to backtrack your steps to remember where you left it…however, it keeps all my equipment I need in one location.



Wisconsin Home Inspection, ABC Home Inspection LLC


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Originally Posted By: dvalley
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I carry a 35 pocket tool bag (all pockets being filled with miscellaneous tools) with my long termite probe always on top. When I arrive at the house I go straight to the kitchen to set up (that’ll be my temporary office). I then grab my flashlight, place my moisture meter in my back pocket and my outlet tester in my front pocket. I can pretty much perform the interior inspection with these three tools.


When it comes time to inspect the basement, I bring my entire tool bag. No need to go running back upstairs for tools. Most of your tools will be used in the basement or crawls.


![](upload://vUCLHII5WYTqq90iLeMy9SQKqkq.gif)


--
David Valley
MAB Member

Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: rray
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I bought buckets at Home Depot. Then I bought their bucket tool bag that fits into the bucket. All my tools are in the bucket, nothing on my person. Tons of pockets, big and small, and the big flashlight and larger tools fit right in the middle of the bucket. I simply carry the bucket with me wherever I go, and everything is right there, nice and organized. Well, except the ladder. That stays in the car until I need it. I get quite a few comments on how nice our tool buckets are. One of the best items I have purchased for my business.


![icon_twisted.gif](upload://xjO326gspdTNE5QS3UTl0a0Rtvy.gif)


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: jpeck
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Another tool bag user. Except that I use a large flight bag for pilots. I like it better than the tool bags I looked at.


Carry it with me, with my computer in the back pocket, set it down, inspect and enter the information about what I look at, pick it up and go on.

Nothing in my pockets or on me. All in the bag, except, of course (and like Russel said) the ladder.

Don't forget. If you take your ladder out, set it up, then leave it there, you have created 'an attractive nuisance' and you could be liable for anyone getting hurt on your ladder. If you do not leave your ladder in your vehicle, make sure you do not leave it set up.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: jwortham
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I had been debating on the whole tool bucket thing. Wasn’t sure if it was too tradesman like and not professional enough. (No insult to tradesmen intended!)


Until, that is, the master of marketing says he uses it!

If it's good enough for Russell, it works for me.

Home Depot today I guess.


Originally Posted By: rray
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Speaking of professional.


My franchisor keeps pushing white shirts and ties for that "professional" look. As I have told my VP-Operations so many times, first I'm in business for myself because I despise ties.--haven't worn one in 20 years. Second, he can try his darndest to make this a white collar job, but as long as I'm climbing under houses and up in attics (and over the rooftop to grandmother's house we go), ain't gonna be no white collar job. Sorry.

We wear t-shirts. Love t-shirts. The only thing better than t-shirts is not wearing. . . Well, we'll just leave it at that.

I put my company logo on the back of the shirt, big and bold. Since I have my back to everyone most of the time, they may not remember my face, but they'll remember my company. ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)

A logo on your shirt, any kind of shirt, even a tank-top or mesh shirt, provides that "professional" image. Now just figure out what kind of shirt is appropriate for your profession. As much as I would like to believe that my mesh shirts are appropriate for home inspecting, alas, they are not. Those black widows could climb right through that mesh and it would be very difficult to brush them off.




--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: rray
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Here’s a couple of pictures of my tool buckets. Each employee has his own tool bucket with appropriate tools so that no one ever has to “borrow” from anyone else’s bucket. Those who do borrow get sent to. . . . Well, let’s just say that they don’t borrow from each other’s buckets and leave it at that.


http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/BucketandTowel.JPG

http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/Bucket.JPG

![icon_twisted.gif](upload://xjO326gspdTNE5QS3UTl0a0Rtvy.gif)


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.