WDO Inspection in Florida

Can someone help me understand whether a Licensed Home Inspector in Florida is able to perform WDO inspections? Are there additional licensing requirements? I am about to take the Florida Exam, and am trying to make sure I am following the rules.

Thanks!

Mike Hamel

***NO YOU CANNOT PROVIDE A CERTIFICATE. ***

Only a license pest control person can. You can look around and not what you observe but you cannot provide THE sometimes needed certificate. Tons of guys will do it for you probably free or close to it because they can then treat. Those guys had their s h i t together when they went towards licensing.

Thank you, Michael! I am glad I asked… I had an inspection done about a year ago, and the Inspector gave me a deal on the WDO. I just looked to see if they are listed as a Licensed Applicator and I don’t see their name. He is an InterNachi member also. I am assuming that he is not aware of this requirement, so I will look him up and let him know.

You also need to know that you can’t use certain words such as:

termite, fungus, wood rot, etc. unless you have the requisite credentials.

Dom.

He doesn’t have to be an applicator.
He has to be employed by a licensed pest control company and have an id card.

That would depend on how you use them, but to be safe, “damaged” pretty much covers them all. :wink:

Yes… what Eric said.
Look at the WDO doc.
There should be a pest company name somewhere
on it…
Hopefully

Excellent information - I appreciate the responses!

Florida regulates persons who apply pesticides to structures in Florida, as regulated by the Florida Structural Pest Control Law (Chapter 482). Visit the Florida website.

Marline Czerniak from the Florida Department of Agriculture states in a letter to InterNACHI in 2013, *“A home inspector upon observing some apparent WDO damage during the home inspection can state that he observes damage to wood, structure, or whatever he notes, but cannot state that it is due to a WDO organism. As long as they are NOT diagnosing the condition and stating that it’s due to termites or some other pest, they are OK.”

*For more information about home inspections and WDO, visit http://www.nachi.org/florida.htm and scroll down to the “Florida WDO Section.”

…so I’m still confused, but admittedly I’m new to home inspection and wanted to expand my services offered to perspective Home Buyers and maybe naively thought by taking the InterNACHI course for WDO I would be certified to do inspections. Having read the posts I know believe it will not allow me to do inspections and complete the form. If that is true, I think it should be spelled out more clearly. want to do the right thing.

It is spelled out in the laws of the state. You need a Pest Control Operator’s/ID card to do the inspections. Inachi serves many areas not just this state.

In Florida, as an HI, you cannot comment on WDO in any way (evidence of WDO, droppings, wings, wood rot, etc.). However, most Florida HI’s have a pest control company that does the WDO for them. You schedule with the WDO company to meet you during the HI and they do the WDO portion of the inspection and give you a report. The typical fee is $35-$60. Keep that in mind when you are quoting jobs. I’m sure many of the Florida HI’s can pass along contact info for reliable WDO companies that they currently use.

Marline Czerniak from the Florida Department of Agriculture states in a letter to InterNACHI in 2013:
“A home inspector, upon observing some apparent WDO damage during the home inspection, can state that he observes damage to wood, structure, or whatever he notes, but cannot state that it is due to a WDO organism. As long as they are NOT diagnosing the condition and stating that it’s due to termites or some other pest, they are OK.”
Visit http://www.nachi.org/florida.htm and scroll down that page to the WDO section for details.

I like that word also. I said it to a seller the other day about some windows where the balance was “broke” in 5 windows. He was letting me know they were on schedule to be repaired. I said would just note in my report as damaged but due to be repaired and he said no they are not damaged :roll:

We have had this discussion many times before. You cannot use the term WDO in your inspection reports. But the term termite does not belong to the department of agriculture. If you now what the damage is there is nothing wrong with saying termite damage. Just make sure you are correct. If you are not sure what the damage is just list it as damage. I have been using the word termite in my report for years. Never caused a problem.

I work with a WDO inspector and make notes in my report such as " termite damage was discovered at so and so (see attached WDO report). And have photos of said damage or whatever, wood decay, stucco below grade ect. This way I am noting the damage along with photos and stating that whatever was discovered by the WDO inspector. The WDO reports do not include photos. This way the client has photos and I refer any questions about the damage and repairs to the WDO inspector.
If I see damage and the client didn’t order the WDO. I write up possible wood decay/damage discovered. Further evaluation is needed from a licensed termite/WDO inspector. If I am speaking to the client, I say yes in my opinion that’s probably termite damage, my licence does not permit me to make or write that assertion.

Not sure if this will revive a long-dead thread, but…

I was trained by S**r’s Termite & Pest Control (in South Florida), while in their employ in 1997. Each “technician” was required (state-mandated) to complete various training modules and show competency in the material. However, I do not remember receiving an ID card (does not mean I did not get one…that was 21 years ago), but I do know documents were kept on file at the company’s office. So, today -while I do not remember whether or not I ever had an ID card- I still have the knowledge from my training.

According to everything I read on the FL DOA’s website I am dis/unqualified, though, I have the knowledge base (with proven competency in training and field work), but not the legal position to perform a WDO inspection, with the FL Form-13645.

I was performing a HI yesterday and the PC tech arrived to perform the WDO for the prospective buyer. I was astonished to see this tech do less than what was required of S**r’s techs for a FREE inspection/consultation! :shock:

So, does anyone know of a way to LEGITIMATELY/LEGALLY perform WDO reports as a HI in FL? Or know (proven) a specific governmental department to contact to procure the needed licensure without starting another business/company?

Thanks in advance for any help.

You cannot perform a Florida WDO report without a business license or at a minimum an “employee ID card” under the WDO category.
Some home inspectors illegally have an ID card, although per state law they are NOT an employee getting a required paycheck (for proof) from the pest control company.
It’s called “renting a license” ~ not allowed.
<<MG>> State Lic Termite/Lawn & Ornamental/Pest Control Operator #2446 :slight_smile:

Here’s a few fake “employees” doing WDO inspections - renting a license - got caught :shock: