What us this loop attached to the roof?

What is this? This is the second time I’ve seen this.
Thanks!

Fall Arrest system anchor.

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And if you’re a nice inspector you put the cover back on (and it probably blows off again before you reach the ground). And, if you’re a REALLY nice inspector you check from the attic and make sure it’s firmly attached and all nail holes are filled.

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So left behind by the roofers? Should it be uninstalled or is it all right to leave it?

If you follow OSHA, you have to leave it.

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Always leave in place. (Now required to be installed in many areas on new builds).
In fact, you should have hooked to it while you were on the roof! :wink:

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Left behind, the boot cover is off the ring. Who ever used it last did not put it back on.

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Was there something similar to this in the attic?

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This is what a roofer will clip onto with his safety harness. Usually this will be inside an attic - especially with townhouses

How do you clip to it if it’s located inside the attic?

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:rofl: :joy: :rofl: :joy: :rofl:

:joy: :rofl: :joy:

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There are several types. Some are surface mount, some mount inside the attic with strap or plate protruding thru the decking.


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Jeff, you hook to the ring. LOL
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Absolutely leave it!

Be sure to put the cover back, ensuring it drains properly (so is not trapping water). That cover has a purpose (quiz of the week creators take note), see if you can figure it out.

This anchor is used with a roofing harness with a loop on the back as these well hung models illustrate:

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And I would take the presence of such an anchor as a good sign that the installer was competent. The four exposed nail placements are a bit suspect… they may go into the sheathing only and may be missing tar or sealant, and/or should be covered by a shingle.

Myself? I’d be scared to hook to that anchor without first checking that it’s rust free and properly hooked to a rafter inside.

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do any of you all ever hook into these? i usually take them as an early warning that the roof may be dangerous for me to be on. my thinking is, if professional roofers use them for safety, I should either be using them or not be up there.I dont think ive ever seen one on a roof less than 8or9 over 12 or something relatively steep.

Some construction sites or contractors may require them regardless of roof pitch. The loops have no bearing on my decision to walk a roof.

And no, I do not tie onto them while performing a roof inspection

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OSHA requires Fall Restraint Systems for use on Flat/Low Slope roofs also, so ‘pitch’ has nothing to do with worker safety!

https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.140

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copy that. i figured they were only required after a certain point because I come across lots of new construction without them but the steep ones do, at least in my experience in Texas.

yea, i figured it wasnt an osha thing but a policy thing. after all, osha defines “steep roof” as anything over 4/12… as one roofing company owner told me, “the osha definition is a joke - my roofers can play basketball on anything under 5/12” :joy:

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If you are working for an employer and covered under workers compensation, the minute you are walking more than 6’ above the ground, you need to tie off, unless of course there are other means to prevent you from falling.

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thanks. what if I’m a contractor and I bought my own WC? would not using fall protection on a roof nullify my coverage, you think?