Change to home inspector licensing coming to BC.

http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=acda4235cd25a7066075b7c55&id=576c463b24&e=5865d35a66

Thanks Nick, seems like a good thing. That will definitely be the end of some Associations.

Interesting Thanks Nick Much appreciated… Roy

Yep. Associations are now going to have to compete on membership benefits: www.nachi.org/benefits.htm

I love it.

NACHI Number one for over ten years … Roy

Yes it’s good for Nachi.

How about CanNachi? What are they to Nachi.org? Are they representative of Nachi in Canada? I see they have their own membership but none of the Nachi.org benefits. Is Nachi.org involved in any way with CanNachi? Same logo but are not part of the logo list on Nachi.org like Ontarioachi is. Site is terrible outdated, is this a dead project?

Any info on the subject is appreciated. Thanks.

This is the survey that pushed the changes. Was very interesting to read it, check it out:

http://www2.gov.bc.ca/local/haveyoursay/Docs/home_inspector_licensing_consult_report.pdf

CanNACHI is a friendly sister association (I’m on the B.O.D.). Originally, it was formed to be approved as one of the associations that BC required everyone to join. It procured that approval. But it appears now that BC is no longer going to require association membership. They probably never should have to begin with. InterNACHI didn’t acquire so many members because some government agency forced inspectors to join InterNACHI. I hate when they do that. I like to know that every dollar in dues that InterNACHI collects is being earned. InterNACHI has to earn the dues we collect and we have to earn those dues every day. The inspection industry loves InterNACHI because we work hard for our members. That’s the way I like it.

Well said Nick. Associations should be the choice of the inspector in every aspect.

Although the choice is quite clear :slight_smile:

Sounds like BC will adopting the CSA Standards

Thanks David
("Today there are 440 licensed home inspectors in B.C. To be licensed as a home inspector in B.C., ")
a person has to meet the requirements of one of the four designated associations.
Currently, Consumer Protection BC (CPBC) is responsible for the designation of home inspector

One thing I found interesting is that there are 440 licensed home inspectors in BC.
WOW! At what cost do you keep a government program alive for 440 people…is that the new minimum?
Hard to believe that 440 people wreak such havoc in BC that they need licensing.
You think they’d license roofers and renovators first!

What are the BC dues for a home Inspector .
Some how this seems to me like a Big money looser for the BC government .

Good question and valid observation–although you missed one point–since when has any level of government anywhere, ever cared how much money they lose? Its not theirs and there is an endless supply, so no problem!

Not sure about the endless supply Stuart.

The Government get their income from taxes.
You pay taxes if you make a profit.
If licensing reduces the income of inspectors to the level they don’t make a profit, someone else will have to pick up the slack.

As that cycle goes on, eventually the source dries up, because the only ones with money are big business and the mega rich, and any government who taxes them don’t remain in government very long.

There has to be a balance.

LOL I am well aware (as is everyone here) that the government gets their revenue from taxes! My guess is licencing fees will not be dependent on taxes and whether or not the inspector is profitable or not–its going to be a flat fee–pay if you want to play.

They don’t care if we are profitable (or even working I sometimes wonder), so long as a new revenue stream has been created and the public has a phoney sense of comfort from licencing (after all all licenced drivers are great right!)

I truly wish there was a balance in all of this but you only have to look at history to know there isn’t one (still waiting for my billions back on ornge, gas plants, mars building leases, useless hydro meter, green energy…the list goes on)

The ontario taxpayer IS an endless supply of funds because I have yet to see a business plan from the government that actually shows a profit.

Getting back to the main topic, I find it abundantly clear that BC is going to adopt the CSA standard when it is finished. I just hope they do a second draft review before it is finalized so we can have our say again.

I find it also interesting that the questionnaire points out that CRAPI has the overwhelming majority of members in BC. I wonder if that will change when you no longer have to be in an association to be licensed?

I also find it interesting that only 5% of the People were unhappy with there home inspector but not one went to litigation. With that in mind why is there such a huge need for licensing?

And that would be because governments are not supposed to make profits. Back to civics class harrison.

My personal experience is that governments in Canada are not out there looking for more stuff to do there is a lot of competition from within for those tax dollars. If government is getting involved in something new it is because there was a lot of pressure from without put on them to take up the new task. You can argue whether the pressure was legitimate or was stirred up by the irresponsible, but you can’t deny its existence.
If you want government to stay out of your business, fight back, find out who is the putting pressure on government (can you say insurance boys and girls?) you may also find that your own colleagues are the guilty ones. A lot of people believe that licensing is a convenient way to limit competition. (wrong wrong wrong)

http://www.saanichnews.com/business/289983531.html

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Business](http://www.saanichnews.com/business/)
**B.C. still regulating wild west of home inspection ](http://www.addthis.com/bookmark.php) **

· by Travis Paterson - Saanich News](http://www.saanichnews.com/staff_profiles/24367307.html)
· posted Jan 27, 2015 at 2:00 PM

Bruce McClure wants to see a regulated home inspection industry that’s fair to real estate agents, buyers and inspectors.
— image credit: Submitted
Prospective home owners rejoice, the cloud of confusion is soon to lift off the industry regulations governing home inspection in B.C.
Clearing up the bureaucratic boondoggle has been on Christy Clark’s agenda since she was elected.
On Jan. 15 the government will sit down with an advisory committee made up of representatives from B.C. Housing, as well as the two bigger home inspection agencies in B.C., the Canadian Association of Home and Property Inspectors (B.C. chapter) and Applied Science Technologist and Technicians of B.C., and others.
The goal is to improve the 2009 home inspector regulations overseen by Consumer Protection B.C., which aren’t strong enough, says
executive director Helene Barton of CAHPI’s B.C. office in Kelowna.
“The 2009 regulations were a start but Consumer Protection also approved other associations for licensing in B.C. and in turn not all organizations are following the policies and the regulations of the industry,” Barton said.
“Now they’ll insure everyone is under the same standard so if you hire someone, it won’t matter which of the four associations they’re from.”
Barton hopes to see the updated rules and regulations in place by April 1.
While the decades long scenario is nearly under control in B.C. it’s still up in the air in other provinces.
Alberta is considering the Canadian Standards Association’s scrupulous CSA-A770, which demands an inspection so thorough it would take 16 to 32 hours, likely costing buyers more than $1,000 in labour.
“In B.C. we’re 110 per cent against (CSA-A770), it’s a non-starter,” Barton said.
And it’s not just Canada, as the lack of home inspection regulation is a rampant across North America, says Ontario home inspector Bruce McClure. His book Buy Or Run tries to answer the question of who really controls the home inspection industry in North America?
“Alberta, in frustration, turned to CSA and said ‘write us a legislation for home inspections,” McClure explained. “That was tabled in September for a public input period, and the document is so far over the top so it doesn’t make sense, home inspectors across the country are up in arms.”
The other problem McClure pokes fun at, but also wants to see dealt with (and which exists in B.C) is the impressive sounding credentials used by home inspectors which mean very little.
“If you’re a registered home inspector it means you’re a member of CAHPI with 200-plus home inspections, and around 500 hours of education, peer reviewed by fellow inspectors. Or you could be a certified master home inspector, which demands a $1,000 fee but with hardly any experience. Which sounds more impressive?,” McClure asks.
Lost in the context of regulating the industry, of course, is ending the conflict of interest that comes with real estate agents using a ‘thumbs up’ home inspector.
“There are a lot of good home inspectors out there, but this is a floundering industry in need of regulation.”
reporter@saanichnews.com

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story’s topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use](http://www.saanichnews.com/terms_of_use/). Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
** Related Stories**
§ B.C. to tighten home inspection standards](http://www.saanichnews.com/national/vancouver/275828751.html)
§ Inspections would condemn reserve homes: chief](http://www.saanichnews.com/national/286017671.html)
§ Fire commissioner calls for band home inspections](http://www.saanichnews.com/national/286287371.html)
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http://www.saanichnews.com/business/289983531.html

·
Business](http://www.saanichnews.com/business/)
B.C. still regulating wild west of home inspection

· by Travis Paterson - Saanich News](http://www.saanichnews.com/staff_profiles/24367307.html)
· posted Jan 27, 2015 at 2:00 PM

Bruce McClure wants to see a regulated home inspection industry that’s fair to real estate agents, buyers and inspectors.
— image credit: Submitted
Prospective home owners rejoice, the cloud of confusion is soon to lift off the industry regulations governing home inspection in B.C.
Clearing up the bureaucratic boondoggle has been on Christy Clark’s agenda since she was elected.
On Jan. 15 the government will sit down with an advisory committee made up of representatives from B.C. Housing, as well as the two bigger home inspection agencies in B.C., the Canadian Association of Home and Property Inspectors (B.C. chapter) and Applied Science Technologist and Technicians of B.C., and others.
The goal is to improve the 2009 home inspector regulations overseen by Consumer Protection B.C., which aren’t strong enough, says
executive director Helene Barton of CAHPI’s B.C. office in Kelowna.
“The 2009 regulations were a start but Consumer Protection also approved other associations for licensing in B.C. and in turn not all organizations are following the policies and the regulations of the industry,” Barton said.
“Now they’ll insure everyone is under the same standard so if you hire someone, it won’t matter which of the four associations they’re from.”
Barton hopes to see the updated rules and regulations in place by April 1.
While the decades long scenario is nearly under control in B.C. it’s still up in the air in other provinces.
Alberta is considering the Canadian Standards Association’s scrupulous CSA-A770, which demands an inspection so thorough it would take 16 to 32 hours, likely costing buyers more than $1,000 in labour.
“In B.C. we’re 110 per cent against (CSA-A770), it’s a non-starter,” Barton said.
And it’s not just Canada, as the lack of home inspection regulation is a rampant across North America, says Ontario home inspector Bruce McClure. His book Buy Or Run tries to answer the question of who really controls the home inspection industry in North America?
“Alberta, in frustration, turned to CSA and said ‘write us a legislation for home inspections,” McClure explained. “That was tabled in September for a public input period, and the document is so far over the top so it doesn’t make sense, home inspectors across the country are up in arms.”
The other problem McClure pokes fun at, but also wants to see dealt with (and which exists in B.C) is the impressive sounding credentials used by home inspectors which mean very little.
“If you’re a registered home inspector it means you’re a member of CAHPI with 200-plus home inspections, and around 500 hours of education, peer reviewed by fellow inspectors. Or you could be a certified master home inspector, which demands a $1,000 fee but with hardly any experience. Which sounds more impressive?,” McClure asks.
Lost in the context of regulating the industry, of course, is ending the conflict of interest that comes with real estate agents using a ‘thumbs up’ home inspector.
“There are a lot of good home inspectors out there, but this is a floundering industry in need of regulation.”
reporter@saanichnews.com

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story’s topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use](http://www.saanichnews.com/terms_of_use/). Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
Related Stories

§ B.C. to tighten home inspection standards](http://www.saanichnews.com/national/vancouver/275828751.html)
§ Inspections would condemn reserve homes: chief](http://www.saanichnews.com/national/286017671.html)
§ Fire commissioner calls for band home inspections](http://www.saanichnews.com/national/286287371.html)
§ Mine dam inspections ordered across B.C.](http://www.saanichnews.com/news/271728681.html)
§ Mine inspections beefed up in B.C.](http://www.saanichnews.com/business/289857441.html)
§ Flu vaccine plant inspection finds 10 issues](http://www.saanichnews.com/national/268274612.html)

Thanks Roy,

David

566

http://bc.ctvnews.ca/insider-tips-for-home-buyers-and-sellers-1.2218944

Insider tips for home buyers and sellers .

Sandra Hermiston and Lynda Steele, CTV Vancouver
Published Tuesday, February 10, 2015 6:00AM PST
Last Updated Tuesday, February 10, 2015 9:17AM PST
As real estate prices continue to soar in Metro Vancouver a new survey of
U.S. realtors is providing some insider secrets and insight on how to
negotiate the best deal when buying or selling a home.

The Consumer Reports survey of more than 300 American real estate
agents found 86 per cent of those polled say they’ve seen other agents
engage in poor business practices.

At the top of the list: steering buyers toward a home that would result in
higher commissions.
Twenty-seven-per-cent say they’ve seen other agents convince a client to
sell a home for less than it’s worth.

Consumer Reports says don’t hire the first agent you meet.
Interview at least three, and check references.

If you’re selling a house, don’t overpay the agent’s commission.
The survey found that more than 60 per cent are willing to negotiate at
least half the time.
When it comes to other costs, be conservative with your estimates.
A third of agents surveyed said buyers get into trouble by
underestimating what it costs to buy and own a home.

“It’s not just about your monthly mortgage payment.
When you’re buying a home, you have to think about paying a lawyer,
your closing costs, and the title search.
And then there are the ongoing
costs of home ownership, such as taxes and utilities,”
said Mandy Walker of Consumer Reports.

In B.C. buyers also have to pay the Property Transfer Tax (PTT),
which is charged calculated on the property’s purchase price.

A $500,000 property would be subject to a total tax of $8,000.
Finally, don’t skip the home inspection.

More than a quarter of agents say that not getting an inspection
can be one of the more costly mistakes.

Read more: http://bc.ctvnews.ca/insider-tips-for-home-buyers-and-sellers-1.2218944#ixzz3ROv3bKuF

Some Provinces are going after home Inspectors .
I think they need to look at the agents Big Time they also
make far more then inspectors with far less liabilities.