Help identifying list of defects

1938 flip house in Atlanta, renovations within 12 months. I do not know what was permitted. I am not 100% sure about every issues here. The exterior main disconnect is 100 amp CB, the interior disconnect at the panel is 200 amp. The panel max rating was not listed. I found several additional issues with branch wiring, electrical receptacles etc. I certainly have enough to call in an electrician for further evaluation. If you all could weigh in with your concerns I would greatly appreciate it. This is good education for me. Thanks!

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Why don’t you list what you think is wrong and others can add to the discussion.

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Sure. Missing dead front, 200 amp downstream from 100 disconnect? Evidence of arcing at the ground. Why is the 100 amp even there? Double tap. Missing strain relief.

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100 amp service entrance cable.

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Where are the double taps? Those Square D circuit breakers in the sub panel are allowed to have two conductors going in the side, but correct me if I’m wrong.

I did see grounding conductors and neutrals bonded together on the same bar in the sub panel. That’s a safety hazard.

And shouldn’t it have a mast head with drip loops above the main panel?

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From TN it appears that there is paint overspray in the service panel.
Neutral and ground under the same lug (is that the double-tap you were talking about?)

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I am not sure how to read the label, I am researching that now. Double tap

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If you look at the two conductors next to Cu on the sticker–that is where it indicates that two copper conductors are allowed. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong though. I’ve inspected a lot of these circuit breakers before.

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No, I was concerned about the two wires connected to the Sq D breaker. But I have found two articles on the subject that says this double connection is OK based on the CB label.

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So, the main service is attached to the side of the home, then the service wraps around the corner of the home and drops down to the meter. That appears to be unconventional and likely much older than the everything from the disconnect to the distribution panel; which is all modern.

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A drip loop appears to be missing from that point right before the service entrance conductors enter the conduit on the side of the home. Water can go right down into the conduit from there, unless it’s some kind of optical illusion.

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There is a drip loop (optical illusion). However, The SEC is clamped to the side of the home, runs down the turns a corner and down again to the meter.

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Wires going into the 100 CB look like they have gotten a hair cut. ??

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Good eye!! I just zoomed in on my photos and yep, they were whittled down to fit and are all nicked up.

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The inside 200 amp breaker is being just used as a switch. As Scott said, you have a 100 amp service.

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The 200 downstream of the 100 is not an issue.

Two conductors on the Homeline breakers are not an issue.

The neutrals should not be sharing a hole with anything else. The grounds should not on the neutral bus in the subpanel.

Missing locknut at the bottom PVC conduit.

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Thanks for helping out everyone! :+1: :+1:

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The SER cable in the PVC raceway almost certainly has violated the minimum 5X bend radius when it enters the LB conduit body. I see SER cable leaving the service disconnect but I do not see the bare EGC.

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@rmeier2 Good stuff!

Ok, lot of acronyms there.
SER cable?
LB conduit?
EGC?

If you don’t mind help me out here a bit for clarity.

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SER is a cable type.

LB is the fitting below the disconnect that turns into the house.

Equipment grounding conductor, runs with the feeder or the branch circuits. Carries a fault current back to trip the breaker.

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