Is ther a problem with these trusses?

(Robert Sole, CMI) #1

Just kidding. Saw these trusses in an attic today on a Wind Mit. Customer just moving in. I asked them if they had a home inspection. They said that they had but that the seller had repaired the trusses.

Note that there are only one or two screws in the 2Xs that they put in as a “Repair”.

(William H. Smith, HI1354) #2

Uncle Bob special

(Robin Wells) #3

Parts cut out of them… but have had material added in attempt to replace missing pieces. Can not comment… as would only be a guess if this is acceptable to correct the pieces cut out.

But if only two screws… would question it.

(Robert Sole, CMI) #4

You didn’t have get personal!!

Bob Sole

(Paul Lesieur, CMI) #5

Looks like the web pieces are missing.

(Sean Fogarty) #6

Poor people really got shafted. I wonder where the ball was dropped on that one.

(Robert Sole, CMI) #7

I think it was dropped by trusting the sellers to use a contractor to do the repairs that knew what he was doing. Those repairs are more like what I would expect from a handyman.

(Robin Wells) #8

They are… but looks like they tried to prop up with vertical pieces on each side. Just not sure how this works as a replacement structurally or strength wise.

(Travis K. Johnson, FL HI8719) #9

WOW!!

(Linas Dapkus, CMI) #10

That greatly increases the head room and storage space in the attic.

(Bradley K. Toye, CMI) #11

While this modification was done to create attic storage, this also created a big problem with the attic floor / ceiling support (which is even more important when loading it up with storage items). What exactly are those purlin support studs resting on? The whole thing needs to be assessed. I would call it out for engineering approval.

(Jeffrey R. Jonas) #12

**Every **damaged truss gets…

(William E. Siegel) #13

I took ten posts before someone actually posted something of value. If the rest of you do not know this you need a lot more education.

All damaged and altered trusses in Florida are required to be engineered. Permits are required for all repairs and alterations. There are no exceptions!

(Frank Rotte, , CPI, San Diego Home Inspector) #14

WTF was somebody thinking? Why do they think that engineers design these things?

(Dennis P. Quigley) #15

I didn’t read previous post, but this is not correct. The trusses have been moidified by having the webbing removed so that they could have attic storage. You cannot modify trusses without structural engineer design. This is not the way a Professional Engineer would design it. It would have an elaborate plywood gusset plate added to both sides of each truss in addition to vertical members. Homeowner special —

(Robert Sole, CMI) #16

Dennis, you are absolutely right. They have to replace the missing webs with the same size and grade lumber and connect them with plywood gussets, usually nailed 2"OC on both sides.

When I was a Quality Control Manager for a local builder, I had one of the truss engineers send me the “Cheat sheet” they used to design the repairs. I was able to tell the superintendent how to repair the truss and all they had to do was draw up what they did and send it to the engineer. The engineer would stamp it and send it back. Saved a lot of time.

The people who made these “repairs” had no clue.