Master Inspector - THE DEFINITION

It was Blaine on 1/1/06 (so just under a year) - here is the text and a link to the thread:

http://www.nachi.org/forum/showthread.php?t=590&highlight=GCMI

Omit all references to NACHI and its convention and add the opportunity to apply for credit for life experience, and it is much the same. I think it will work.

No politics. Everything quantified and recorded on a transcript. Neat, easy and clean.

It is accessable to Old Timers and Doogie Howsers, alike.

Or perhaps let this stand as an educational milestone, while adding a separate designation based on experience and in-field accomplishments.

(When the original idea was posted by Blaine, NACHI still owned the CMI - I am not sure who currently owns it.)

Nick owns it. CMI can still remain the title.

CLEP is a program which allowed college credit for life experience. I think that the idea of experience trumping education may be backa$$wards. Perhaps those with lots of experience can trade it for educational credits toward CMI. In business, where college degrees are required, many employers dont care what experience you have. They want the diploma. Some will allow experience as an acceptable substitute for the educational requirement. The model never puts experience over educational requirements. So, we need to put the experience in proper proportion.

I also believe that you either qualify as a CMI or you do not. I was never in favor of GCMI.

To me, its a designation for those who lack experience in a program which requires it. I think the experience part is subjective, and GMCI is the same as “candidate”.

Both suck.

didn’t Nick post that he was transferring the rights to it to the MICB?

Agreed. The last thing we need are two levels of CMI.

Set the standard using an educational model. Allow credits to be applied toward that model for experience, when deemed appropriate by the education provider. CLEP is an excellent model for that.

Take the politics away from the designation and you will have a meaningful designation.

ICC credentialing is also education oriented, yet many in the profession find it to be a worthy goal and it is fairly widely respected. This could be the type of thing that the GCMI might equate to.

HAving spearte designations allows the individual to choose for themselves which is the more desirable. For those who believe that education takes a back seat to experience, and don’t wish to be equated to a newbie with a lot of book knowledge who has never inspected a single home, they have a designation to pursue.

For those who think education is paramount (as I’m sure all the ed vendors will) then there is an educational equivalent.

Ultimately, if the bar is set high enough both could be respected designations. If not, it will be what CMI is now…

I disagree. One designation is all that is required to achieve the objectives to distinguish an inspector and to market him to the public as being certified “master”. Additional designations simply dilute and confuse.

Experience can be taken into account in this model by quantifying it in comparison to an educational model. It is already being done in colleges and universities throughout the world. There is no reason to believe it would not work here.

Without an objective quantifier, you are left with Hoopy.

OK - so, no change to the current formula, then, since experience can already be substituted for education and vice versa?

Oh- except that we are putting Ed Vendors in charge…oh wait, they currently are.

Here in NY, you can take 5 classes, offered for free by the State. Each has an exam at the end. After that, you are ICC certified, and are duly qualified to perform the duties of municipal code official, chartered with the health and safety of building occupants. No experience necessary. In fact, after completing the first 2 classes, you are qualified as a Fire Marshall.

These are State sanctioned positions, officially chartered with the health and safety of the public. Again, no experience necessary.

Like I said, this (ICC certification) is an eduaction-only distinction that many hold in high esteem. I was likening the GCMI proposal to that.

Making CMI an educational level distinction automatically, as does any degreed program, puts the student in the hands of the educational administrator.

One uniformed system that all providers must comply with will de-politicize it. Providers will then be competing against each other for students, using a standard program. We can only benefit from this competition…a competition which the current president of CMI (and owner/operator of Inspection Depot, an education provider) is apparently resistant to. Go figure.:roll:

I think there is some support for the idea that veteran inspectors with thousands of inspections under their belt are better inspectors than newly minted graduates with 1000 hours of ed but not a single inspection to their name.

A strictly educational designation is not what I would think of as a “master” inspector, but there are certainly education-oriented designations that are highly respected by many, and this can become just another one of those, if so desired.

For what it is worth-

A Certified Master Inspector has exceeded the standards the industry has set forth for all practicing property inspectors.

They have improved/enhanced their technical skills in both the Classroom and in the Field, on a continuing basis.
They have enhanced their skills of investigation, documentation and communication, for the needs of their Clients, on a continuing basis.
They constantly strive to promote a better understanding of our Industry, through actions, communication, marketing and education to the Consumer/Client base, who utilizes our services.
They have shown, by action, that business ethics stands tall in our industry, and not subject to negotiation.

The moniker “CMI” for our Industry won’t be the last invented. There is always room at the top for growth and improvement. This is just the 1st step in the evolution of our Industry. Lets not get to carried away with this time of learning and growing.
Just because I have the “CMI designation” doesn’t mean I’m gonna stop learning, growing, striving to better myself and the Industry, and I don’t see anyone else stopping either.

I’ll give it some more thought, but this is a start for me.

For what it is worth-

A Certified Master Inspector has exceeded the standards the industry has set forth for all practicing property inspectors.

They have improved/enhanced their technical skills in both the Classroom and in the Field, on a continuing basis.
They have enhanced their skills of investigation, documentation and communication, for the needs of their Clients, on a continuing basis.
They constantly strive to promote a better understanding of our Industry, through actions, communication, marketing and education to the Consumer/Client base, who utilizes our services.
They have shown, by action, that business ethics stands tall in our industry, and not subject to negotiation.

The moniker “CMI” for our Industry won’t be the last invented. There is always room at the top for growth and improvement. This is just the 1st step in the evolution of our Industry. Lets not get to carried away with this time of learning and growing.
Just because I have the “CMI designation” doesn’t mean I’m gonna stop learning, growing, striving to better myself and the Industry, and I don’t see anyone else stopping either.

I’ll give it some more thought, but this is a start for me.

Folks

Thank you to everyone for their input here. The information is invaluable. Keep it coming.

When this is all through, I need a couple of volunteers to print it off and try come up with a definition for us based on this information. Lets see if we can get close.

Of course I will do the same.

Thanks

Michael

Most real inspectors performing visual inspection are required to take an eye exam, just a thought.:smiley:

Brian; You are just too funny. :slight_smile: :stuck_out_tongue:

Marcel

Patch up the other eye and you would be legitimately qualified to join ASHI: http://www.ashi.org/inspectors/join/candidate_application1.htm

And unlike you… I don’t think it’s too funny.