New and nervous inspector

Good luck. Work hard, be honest and polite. It will come to you.

Don’t give up on finding someone to ride along with. Go to great lengths to find someone. The experience is invaluable. I had decades of experience but chose to start with apprenticeship.

Hello! I have my first full house inspection with wind mitigation and 4 point booked this Friday and I’m really nervous. It is going to be an occupied house with the buyer and seller agent being present. I’m afraid that I’m not experienced enough and confident with how to present myself and they would see me less qualified for the job. Being a woman, more so. I feel its easier to read and understand the deficiencies on paper, but when its in front of me, I get lost.
Id really appreciate some boost on how to be more confident and be able to convey my knowledge to the homebuyer. Thanks!

1 Like

Be firm but kind, demand room to inspect without interruptions. Tell them you will see them at the end for a summary but the report will be the final say. Just my 2 cents.

3 Likes

Trust me, it’s a 99% chance you know more than they do. Be confident and don’t get outside your lane. Like Brian said above, tell them you’ll explain any issues at the end of the inspection and that you want to focus on the inspection. Be concise on your report… don’t write any dissertations!
Good luck

3 Likes

Don’t let them follow you around!!! Tell them you need to focus to do a top notch inspection. State there are multiple items always on your mind; things you saw early in the inspection that may show up in areas later on. Tell them you don’t want to forget to report something because of their questions and destractions. It’s for your clients own good that they let you do your work solo. That way you can focus, not forget something you saw earlier, and not have to interact or act confident in front of your client. Clients will respect those ground rules, so long as you set them at the start. I actually tell my clients and agents this rule at the time of scheduling.

Assure them you’ll summarize your findings during a walk through at the end of your inspection. I like these post fieldwork walk throughs. It’s the personal interaction time of the inspection, with all that goes along with that process. Sometimes I will even add inspection photos during the walk through, something I want to add to the inspection. Act like the expert that the client wants to see in you.

6 Likes

Thanks for the motivation!

1 Like

Update : got my licence, insurance, business EIN, found and customized sample reports (basically just added logo, name,etc). Talked to a few people but no one is overly interested since I’m not certified (working on that next). Realized there isn’t a local chapter here in Pensacola, so no help there. I have an inspection on Friday (unpaid- experience) that I’m nervous about since it’s my first one (that wasn’t my own house). Would really like to have a few ride-alongs just to help ease my fear.

How are you licensed but not certified? Just confused by this statement.

2 Likes

Being unpaid does not mean you do not have liability in my opinion, especially if you produce a report. Unless you write all over the report “This was not a professional home inspection. This report should not be relied upon in anyway under any circumstances for any reason at any given time.”

2 Likes

2022-10-06_134950

5 Likes

licensed thru the state of florida but im not an internachi member yet, so im not able to be internachi certified. which is also why i show up as a guest

1 Like

i actually didnt think about that but that would make sense. thank you for the advice.

1 Like

If this is an unpaid inspection, you should not send the report to the homeowner. Keep it to yourself. Produce the report for yourself for practice. Producing a good report is more difficult to learn than doing the actual inspection. You probably have liability if you submit a report to someone. No inspection agreement, not getting paid, so no written report.

3 Likes

While Nachi is a great resource and community learn, you do not need to be “certified” by Nachi to do Home Inspections. All you need in Florida is a Florida HI license and insurance. But with that said find someone or a company who will take you under their belt for the first few inspections regardless of the pay so you learn the process till you’re comfortable on your own.

That is true Danny, but if you are going to make a professional career from HI, why not join an organization that can give you support, ongoing training, and access to volumes of information etc. You do not need it until you need it!

2 Likes

yeah, thats not working out so well. no one wants to help out in this area. trust me, that was my intention in the beginning. shadow someone for a few weeks to get experience and OTJ experience. now, im having to do inspections for friends, unpaid, so i can get experience. the problem im running into is that im thinking im missing a bunch of stuff i should be reporting on, but just not finding it. someone i talked to says he tries to find anything so that the customer believes they get their money’s worth. ive done 2 inspections where the only thing i found was some cracked mortar and a rusty lintel.

I would encourage you expand your radius, offer to pay for ride-alongs if needed. And, as a NACHI member it will open up more access to people willing to help.

1 Like

If you’re only finding a couple things, you probably have a steep learning curve in front of you. Even with a new and well built home, I’ll have 30 +/- findings, mostly minor. Sounds like you need more knowledge of the nuts and bolts of a home. You won’t learn that shadowing someone. One suggestion I have is to purchase Kenton Shepards narrative library. That can serve as a list of typical findings. In addition, you may do well to take one of the inspector training courses that utilizes the NACHI House of Horrors. I see you’re a non member, but since you’re pursuing this field of work, I assume you have already completed the 149 hours of NACHI courses, right?

You need to be an expert on how a house is built and also how it works. You need to be an expert on the remifications of the observations you make.

As I mentioned above, after you get good at the job of identifying issues in a home, you then have as big a task ahead learning how to write up an effective report.

4 Likes

InterNACHI also has some YouTube videos that follow CPIs while they do inspections. Helps you see how others do it in other places and are worth the watch: Performing a Home Inspection with CPI® Brian Cameron - YouTube

2 Likes