The $500,000 Solution

Originally Posted By: jmurray
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The basement was mis-poured to 8 ft. The plans called for 9 feet. here’s the solution that was approved by the site engineer on this $500,000 home! icon_sad.gif










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Originally Posted By: bkelly2
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Well John if he stamped the drawings then it must be ok. icon_wink.gif



“I used to be disgusted, Now I try to Be amused”-Elvis Costello

Originally Posted By: kfulton
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That is good. This one is just as good. eusa_doh.gif


The pockets at each end did not line up, they were off by 3 inches. So, they just cut two of three sections of laminated beam to make it fit. No column under the beam.

[ Image: http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/I/IMGP6496.JPG ]


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Kelley Fulton
True North Home Inspections

...things you think about in dark spaces...

Originally Posted By: jmurray
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bkelly2 wrote:
Well John if he stamped the drawings then it must be ok. ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


No steel beam- wood contact allowed!
Guess they didn't teach that in engineering class. Maybe economics!


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"A little less conversation and a little more action"!

Originally Posted By: jhagarty
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jmurray wrote:


No steel beam- wood contact allowed!



John:

Do you have a specific code reference for this?


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Joseph Hagarty

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Originally Posted By: ckratzer
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Wood in contact with concrete must be treated.


I don’t have my ICC book with me to site a page or number but there is indeed such a requirement.


Cheremie


Originally Posted By: jmurray
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jhagarty wrote:
jmurray wrote:


No steel beam- wood contact allowed!



John:

Do you have a specific code reference for this?


No code requirement used but, open for input.
Steel beams and columns should not bear on wood or pieces of brick.
Steel plate shims should have been used and should have been welded together and to the beam. In essence the entire steel beam is as strong as the wood shims in leveling strength IMO. Not to mention they used "screw jacks ( I mean Adjustable steel columns) throughout to support the steel support beams.


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"A little less conversation and a little more action"!

Originally Posted By: lewens
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John


I honestly don’t see a problem here. The kneewall is the obvious solution for the wrong height of the basement and if I were putting a steel beam on a pressure treated wood foundation it would be esentially the same sort of set up. The builder didn’t support the beam with shims he used solid wood of the appropriate height. The wood appears to be pressure treated, the only thing I would check is if he endcoated the wood at installation.


Larry



Just my usual 12.5 cents


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Originally Posted By: dbush
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I’m with Larry. I think that this is a very viable solution to a sub-contractor’s screw up. John, I am still confused by your comment of no Steel to wood contact.



Dave Bush


MAB Member


"LIFE'S TOUGH, WEAR A HELMET"

Originally Posted By: ckratzer
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I agree,the knee-wall is a good solution to the builders ,OH sh#t !, over site in misreading or not reading the blue print specs.


Further there is nothing wrong with setting steel on solid wood.It is when one shims a beam that one should not use little wood scraps or bricks or any material that could break or compress when addig the weight of the house.Steel shims and even washers are acceptable.


The photo shows essentially a short post made of treated lumber and placed in the beam pocket to support the beam.It is a good fix for a really unfortunate situation.The short wall addition doesn’t compromise the integrity of the structure.It’s just a little shorter than short walls you’re probably used to seeing on a step foundation.


Cheremie


Originally Posted By: jmurray
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Great input from everybody!!!


Many thanks! icon_smile.gif



“A little less conversation and a little more action”!

Originally Posted By: ccoombs
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I use wood posts at steel beams all the time. You need to check the crushing due to the point load. However, there are some issues that should be checked with the condition. There should be a positive connection from the beam to post, post to plate or foundation. I don’t see that except in the last picture. And I’m not sure that is an appropriate weld. The other issue would be to make sure each bearing condition has the minimum bearing area.


To be honest, I see a much bigger potential issue. There is no header over the window!


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Curtis

Originally Posted By: jmurray
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ccoombs wrote:
I use wood posts at steel beams all the time. You need to check the crushing due to the point load. However, there are some issues that should be checked with the condition. There should be a positive connection from the beam to post, post to plate or foundation. I don't see that except in the last picture. And I'm not sure that is an appropriate weld. The other issue would be to make sure each bearing condition has the minimum bearing area.

To be honest, I see a much bigger potential issue. There is no header over the window!


This is the thing with the whole support beam situation.
We know about the wood blocks.

The wood blocks supporting these support beams lie vertical and horizontal. (Not shown in pictures)

The support columns are "adjustable steel columns", screw jacks to some. The columns are not labeled and the screws have not been disabled. I can't tell for certain if these are to be used as permanent columns without proper labeling.

The lengths of the endbearing points (setting on the wood blocks) vary.
Basically there is no uniformity with any of the support beam installation or its components.

As with the positive connection that you mentioned; the one picture is the only occurance (at this point) of the support beams being attached to the wood blocks. I am giving them till the next inspection to finish the rest.

Some or all of this has been approved by the site engineer.
I am not completely convinced that the site engineer is aware of all the methods being employed to carry out his grand plan. In other words I don't believe he has been on site for awhile.


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"A little less conversation and a little more action"!

Originally Posted By: ccoombs
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John


Are the "adjustable steel columns" temporary? When stacking drywall on the floor supports should be provided for floor joist and beams. I have never seen "new" construction using screw jacks as anything other than temporary.

Keep up the pressure and keep asking the questions. The client has hired you to watch out for their best interest. If you are not satisfied with the answers or what you see, keep asking......

Good luck!


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Curtis

Originally Posted By: jmurray
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ccoombs wrote:
John

Are the "adjustable steel columns" temporary? When stacking drywall on the floor supports should be provided for floor joist and beams. I have never seen "new" construction using screw jacks as anything other than temporary.

Keep up the pressure and keep asking the questions. The client has hired you to watch out for their best interest. If you are not satisfied with the answers or what you see, keep asking......

Good luck!


Curtis, there are 2 or 3 companies in the US (that I am aware of) that claim to make an "adjustable steel column" that is touted as permanent. Usually these will be labeled as such.


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"A little less conversation and a little more action"!

Originally Posted By: mcyr
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icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif


Hey, guys, there is nothing wrong with the fix-up mess that you see here.

A steel beam was delegated to support what we are seeing in lieu of a glue lam or TJI or whatever else, and the solid Pressure Treated lumber column post is more that adequate.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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That may mean that the finsh grade can not be as high or the walls have to be thicker or stronger from the original design.


But...
jmurray wrote:
Some or all of this has been approved by the site engineer.

So I guess then from a structural view the point is mute. ![eusa_silenced.gif](upload://3cU7JLvJ6iG8zR8RiVNEerHfvbn.gif)

From an energy stand point, however, the home owner is going to have to spend a bit more for increased heating/cooling for the life of the building. There is now more thermal bridging as well as an extra sill. Sill foam gasket doesn't allways seal as well as it should and sill areas are notorious for energy loss.


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Originally Posted By: jkormos
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Over time the wood will compress and shrink a bit, and what if it starts crack, imho steel should have been the preferred fix.


Originally Posted By: mcyr
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[quote=“jkormos”]Over time the wood will compress and shrink a bit, and what if it starts crack, imho steel should have been the preferred fix./quote]


If it shrinks a bit, it will match the rest of the woodwork in the building.

Preferred fix, an opinion.
Existing solid end wood grain column, adequate.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: kelliott
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I’m not getting any of this thread. Screw jacks? Where? I can’t see them in any of the photo’s.